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Don't get ahead of yourselves: This is not yet another Lincoln-badged Mustang rumor post, the likes of which seem to crop up every few years. Instead, Ford's wayward luxury division is reportedly hoping to gain access to the bits and pieces that will underpin the next-generation pony car – specifically, the MacPherson front and independent rear suspension setup.


Click above for a high-res gallery of the Lincoln MKS with EcoBoost


Not that they ever left, but Lincoln's not going to pull what Cadillac tried in the '90s, switching its entire lineup to FF chassis. Derrick Kuzak, Ford's Lutz, has intimated to Car & Driver that rear wheel drive remains part of Lincoln's plans, and that there's a new FR car under development. While the big news at Lincoln lately is the MKS, that car's fan base will likely not know what stringbacks are.


When we saw the Lincoln MKR at the Detroit Auto Show, we were every bit as excited about the high-tech twin-turbo V6 as we were the sleek-looking RWD sedan. Even the "Twin Force" name given to the hopped-up powerplant struck us as cool. While Ford doesn't necessarily disagree that Twin Force is a great name, the automaker feels customers may think "Force" somehow is more indicative of its 415 horsepower than its fuel-sipping thrift. Ya don't say?!?!?! Ford is looking to re-brand the force-fed di


After the Lincoln MKR found its way to center stage inside the Cobo Arena here in Detroit, Peter Horbury (Ford's North American design chief) stepped out of the Lincoln with the gait of a proud man. Now, that could be just because he avoided the task of explaining Ford's Airstream concept (J Mays must have lost that game of rock-paper-scissors), or perhaps it's because Lincoln has some design cues it can call its own after so many years of wandering the styling wilderness.


Thanks to the 1961 Continental, one of the first things many car fans imagine when they hear "classic Lincoln" is suicide doors. Therefore it's only logical we'd come to expect them on any signature Lincoln show car. The 2002 Continental concept had them, and so did the 2003 Navicross concept. So why did Ford decide to leave them off the striking MKR concept? Automotive News quotes the MKR's exterior designer, Xitij Mistry, saying conventional doors were used on the concept because they're easie

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