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Don't look for a tremendous shifts in automotive market share over the next three years because it might not be coming. That's at least according to the annual Car Wars report by John Murphy, from Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Research.


Little more than a month after leaving the top slot at Volkswagen of India to become managing director of Holden, Australian outlets are reporting that Gerry Dorizas said he wants Holden to be number one in Oz market share by 2020. Dorizas says he believes it can be done with better and more youth-focused product, a better dealership experience and "a lot of work."


Looking at the progress General Motors has made since it entered bankruptcy, it's easy to forget that the company still has a long way to go before it's the juggernaut it once was. A recent report from Reuters points out that, while GM is making money, it isn't making any gains in terms of US market share. Quite the opposite, really.


According to research conducted by global information company IHS Automotive, the leporine birthing of new models by luxury manufacturers over the past six years hasn't increased their market share in the US. Even as car sales reached 15.6 million units, IHS says what's happened instead is that luxury buyers are merely moving from one brand to another, moving from larger luxury vehicles into hot segments like compact luxury crossovers or leaving the market at the same rate as other buyers enter.


Sales funk? What sales funk? When we last touched on the Opel Adam, we noted that after strong early demand, sales were reportedly less than had been hoped for. However, Opel has stepped forward to counter that thought, noting that sales of the stylishly customizable minicar have reportedly exceeded parent General Motors' original projections, with around 21,000 sold in Germany last year alone.


Ford has released projections for its 2013 profits, along with predictions of its 2014 earnings, and the news has forced the company's stock to stumble, falling over seven percent as of this writing. The Blue Oval is expecting earnings of $8.34 billion for 2013, although the bulk of that is coming largely from its North American operations, as troubles abroad continue to take a toll.


Could it be possible that around one in seven of the non-luxury electric vehicles sold in the U.S. will be made by Los Angeles-based startup Coda Automotive?


Seems that the Swiss Family Robinson has stopped throwing its francs at the Volkswagen Golf, and is instead pelting the Subaru XV Crosstrek with its hard-earned geld. According to the Australian blog Best Selling Cars, the Volkswagen Golf has likely been the number one seller in Switzerland every single month since the hatch was first launched in 1974, except for when the Mercedes-Benz W123 sedan briefly deposed it in 1980.


Twenty years ago, Car and Drive wrote about "the emergence of the minivan as the new family car." If you believe Elon Musk, twenty years from now will be a lot more fun.


The annual "Car Wars" report by Merrill Lynch analyst John Murphy predicts that, despite their seizing of U.S. market share over the last few tumultuous years, Korean brands Hyundai and Kia will give it all back and then some to companies like Ford, General Motors and Toyota by 2016.


Most days, California must seem like Kazakhstan for the Big Three. Domestic products aren't so popular out West, where Toyota and Honda have long stood atop the sales charts. But not in 2011.


Domestic automakers have much to be happy about, with Chrysler, Ford and General Motors all gaining market share last year for the first time since 1988. Yet according to Bloomberg, 2012 won't be as good to Detroit. Total sales are projected to grow from 12.8 million vehicles last year to 13.6 million, according to the report, but increasing competition from Korea and a Japanese recovery from the natural disasters of 2011 mean those extra sales aren't likely headed to the Big Three.


Most everyone at Ford is grinning from ear-to-ear these days, as the company is enjoying profits as well as a vastly improved product portfolio and public image. Sales are up, the product pipeline is full, and market share grew last year. You can almost imagine Ford CEO Alan Mulally saying, "What, me worry?"


A plethora of new diesel offerings is driving sales, according to a new report from the Diesel Technology Forum. Sales of diesels rose 27.4 percent in 2011, according to numbers from HybridCars.com and market researchers Baum and Associates.


A plethora of new diesel offerings is driving sales, according to a new report from the Diesel Technology Forum. Sales of diesels rose 27.4 percent in 2011, according to numbers from HybridCars.com and market researchers Baum and Associates.


Automotive News reports that domestic automakers are gaining market share thanks in part to the weak dollar. Import vehicles are currently selling at the highest price premium in 12 years compared to their domestic counterparts.


Volvo C30 DrivE electric vehicle – Click above for high-res image gallery


Forget about more cowbell, for GM it's all about more Chevy -- at least, that's the situation for Chevrolet's new VP Brent Dewar. So far this year the Bowtie has posted more than 60% of GM's North American volume, but Dewar wants that to get to 70%. "As Pontiac goes away, Saturn goes away," Dewar said, "Chevrolet has to step up. The 70 percent target is the right kind of number we need to work on."


It was back in 2002 when Fujio Cho, then-President of Toyota Motor Corp., set the company's goal of achieving a 15 percent share of the global automotive market sometime after 2010. Seven years ago, it didn't seem much of a stretch as the automaker had already captured 10.7 percent, and the seemingly-unstoppable company was rapidly growing.


2010 Ford Mustang – Click above for high-res image gallery


Considering their diminutive and dwindling degree of market share in the U.S., should Suzuki and Mitsubishi say sayonara to America and concentrate their efforts elsewhere? That's what some industry analysts are recommending. Says Yuuki Sakurai of Fukoku Capital Management,"It's time for them to decide whether they pay a high price to continue business there or stop the bleeding," His fellow auto analyst over at Okasan Securities, Yasuaki Iwamoto, agrees and says they should just forget about Am

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