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Marijuana Legalization May Be Having Unexpected Consequence

With the legalization of marijuana spreading through several states in recent years, transportation officials have wondered about the potential for problems with drugged drivers on the nation's roadways. Bet they didn't have this in mind.

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The iPhone app Canary could help people smoking pot know if there are too stoned to drive in states where marijuana is legal.

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A deputy sheriff in Pinal County, Arizona ended up dodged bales of marijuana during a high-speed chase last week.

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is trying to better understand impaired driving in two newly released studies. The first finds the percentage of drugged drivers growing, and the second questions the effect they have on accident rates. Fewer people are driving drunk, though.

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US motorists report being more concerned about drugged driving now than they were three years ago, according to a new report from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

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The argument regarding the legalization of marijuana in Washington and Colorado has its fair share of both supporters and detractors. Some point to a drop in violent crimes and big bumps in tax revenue, while others will point to an increase the number of people driving under the influence. Interestingly, though, that little stat may actually add one more item into the pros column.

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Legal marijuana has not raised danger on the roads so far

Colorado's recent legalization of recreational marijuana has fueled fears about public safety on roadways, with critics pointing to the drug's negative effect on cognitive ability and reaction time. But according to numbers compiled by the Washington Post, traffic fatalities are near historic lows in the state since decriminalization was put into place.

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Would drivers who are "high" travel too fast or too slow for safety?

Amid rancorous debate over other weighty issues Thursday on Capitol Hill, lawmakers wondered aloud whether driving cars after smoking marijuana is dangerous. Among the unanswered questions: Would drivers who are "high" travel too fast or too slow for safety?

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Travelers unable to bring extra weed home ditch it before heading into the airport

Car rental agencies operating at Denver International Airport are reporting tourists with extra pot are frequently handing it off to their employees or stashing their stash in the cars before they return them.

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Court ruling prohibits police from using smell of marijuana as reason for car search

In recent months, a number of states across America have made it easier for law-enforcement officers to meet the standards necessary to search a motorist's car without a warrant during a traffic stop. Massachusetts is headed in the opposite direction.

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Consider our buzz harshed. Legal pot use in Washington and Colorado has had a number of benefits – the Highest State has seen a 2.5-percent drop in violent crime and a big bump in tax revenues ($10 million during the first third of 2014). Washington, meanwhile, is expecting a $190-million increase in tax revenues over the next few years. The legalization of marijuana has also – some might say predictably – contributed to increases in driving while high. Not cool, Washington and

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Teen faces 25 years in prison for deadly crash

Defense lawyers told a jury Thursday pot was not a factor when their teenage client crashed his car in a high-speed accident, even though he was high on the drug at the time.

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Says he's a victim of profiling

A Colorado man was pulled over while on a road trip with his girlfriend just outside Las Vegas, not because he broke any laws, but because his truck carried a Colorado license plate.

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Police are attempting to trace the drugs back to an assembly plant in Mexico

Mechanics in Lorain, Ohio, found eight pounds of pot packed into a woman's spare tire while fixing a flat Wednesday.

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And now for something completely different. That would be from our friends at Extreme Biodiesel, which is in escrow to buy 40 acres of farmland in California. The reason? It wants to cultivate hemp specifically for the conversion to biodiesel. Tailpipe emissions have never been as sweet.

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Controversy remains over what 'too high to drive' looks like

Recreational marijuana sales are heating up in Colorado. As police officers prepare for an increase in impaired drivers there, experts elsewhere are still debating the standards of what makes a driver too high to drive.

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We're a bit hazy on the styling of this particular donk, which was recently spotted hashing about by HotCarsTV at the Southern Heritage Classic Car show in Memphis. Sporting a dope paint job and some wheels that make a blunt statement about what the driver enjoys, it's a unique take on the popular customizing trend.

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Victims claim damages from Ford

Ricardo Magallanes was driving from his home in Juárez, Mexico to the University of Texas El Paso when Board Patrol guards searched his car and found duffle bags bugling with marijuana in his trunk.

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If a college student is caught smuggling drugs across the border, one might think the kid got what was coming to him. But when a Mexican student at the University of Texas in El Paso was caught by Border Patrol agents with duffel bags filled with marijuana in his trunk, the man used a classic excuse: He claimed they weren't his.

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It's going to be a while before we've figured out our brave new marijuana-approved world. The next lesson comes courtesy of the Michigan Supreme Court, which has reportedly ruled that it isn't necessarily against the law for a medical marijuana user to drive with the drug in their system. The ruling comes after motorist Rodney Koon was busted for doing 83 miles per hour in a 55-mph zone and tested positive for "internal possession of marijuana."

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We've seen very creative ways to smuggle drugs across a border with a motorized vehicle (including faux rally trucks) but most don't involve innocent citizens. Giving all of us yet another reason to peer beneath our rides before we travel, innovative Mexican smugglers recently used powerful magnets to hold five-pound bundles of marijuana to the underside of an unsuspecting driver's car as she commuted to her job.

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