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Google Maps shows you the hot spots.

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Grid mix, climate, and local driving patterns affect an EV's emissions.

Looking to lower your carbon footprint? This map will tell you which car to drive.

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According to the Lyft mobile application's update text, the Waze integration has arrived and is "rolling out nationwide."

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Subaru announces Magellan's smartphone-based GPS map and navigation app for future vehicles.

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Uber and TomTom now have a multi-year contract for the navigation company to supply map and traffic data to the ride sharing giant.

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It's been confirmed that Uber is using a camera-studded car to make maps, but it's not autonomous.

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Google owns Waze, and this redesign is certainly welcome. But the app itself needs a fundamental upgrade.

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Bosch and TomTom are partnering to create improved autonomous vehicle tech. They want to have all of the freeways in Germany ready for driverless cars by the end of 2015 with high-definition maps.

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Google's Location History feature keeps track of the places your mobile device has been (if you opt-in and turn it on) and now you can look back through that data with "Your Timeline."

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Developers in Spain use crowdsourcing and online sources to find the scenic way

Mapping services like Mapquest are used to find the quickest route from point A to point B, regardless of the quality of the route. A team of researchers in Barcelona, Spain want to change that with a new algorithm designed to get users to their destination in the most pleasant way possible.

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Google Maps, especially its Street View function, has redefined the way we use maps. The tech giant just launched an update for its mobile app on Android and iOS with a variety of useful, new features.

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Remember the days before GPS? When it was just you, the open road, and a Rand-McNally mapbook tucked beneath the seat? We certainly do, but with the advent of GPS and smartphones, using electronic devices for guidance has become second nature. And it has turned one of the great stereotypes of the sexes sideways.

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Yankun Hou is an auto industry analyst at UBS AG who has won awards for his ability to predict the market. How is he so good at seeing the future of the industry? Satellite imaging.

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The big news in the tech world right now is the World Wide Developer's Conference which Apple just concluded. That's where the House that Jobs Built unveiled its latest operating systems for both computers and mobile devices, its latest laptop computer design and more. But what does this all have to do with cars, you ask? Plenty.

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Google Maps has reinstated the feature letting you know how long a trip will take in current traffic. According to Autoblog's sister site, Engadget, the previous algorithm didn't pass muster, so the updated calculations uses both historical and current traffic conditions to arrive at an estimated time of arrival. It appears on the journeys for which information is available beneath the no-traffic estimate.

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As a graphic designer for nearly 20 years, Cameron Booth credits his deep and abiding love for transit maps to his dad's obsession with trains. The Australian-born, Portland, Oregon-based artist has adapted the infographic aesthetic of subway maps to America's road networks, creating some beautiful new artwork in the process.

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That long-running joke about men being unwilling to stop for directions? Well, it's no joke, at least not according to British insurance firm Sheilas' Wheels. In fact, the average male motorist in Britain travels some 276 extra miles per year simply because he refuses to ask for directions. Worse yet, that amounts to £2,000 ($3,100) worth of wasted fuel over the stubborn man's lifetime.

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That long-running joke about men unwilling to stop for directions? Well, it's no joke, at least not according to British insurance firm Sheilas' Wheels. In fact, the average male motorist in Britain travels some 276 extra miles per year simply because he refuses to ask for directions. Worse yet, that amounts to £2,000 ($3,100) worth of wasted fuel over the stubborn man's lifetime.

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A Los Angeles woman is suing Google for allegedly providing her dangerous walking directions through Google Maps. According to The Wall Street Journal, Lauren Rosenberg used the free service to get walking directions from one end of Park City to the other. The plaintiff claims that the route led her onto a busy highway with no sidewalks and that she was struck by a driver as a result. Rosenberg is seeking over $100,000 in restitution, and her lawsuit names the driver who allegedly struck her as

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Wayfinding in the age of fully-formed cartography isn't too terribly difficult. With land maps evolving daily through satellite imagery and networked resources online, we are never really at risk of being lost (unless the batteries in our GPS run out). From a get-there-from-here perspective, all the answers to all the questions seem to be answered. What else is there to conquer?

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