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The recently-launched Audi A3 Sportback was first-to-market with Long Term Evolution (LTE), or 4G, and LTE integration for connectivity on the move is an idea swirling all through the automotive world. Automakers see the faster speeds and faster responses of LTE compared to 3G as making it possible to one day have streaming video, cloud gaming, more intensive apps and even a virtual office with videoconferencing in your car. It will also enable more progress in machine-to-machine (M2M) adoption,


It appears Audi will be the first to market with in-car LTE service later this year. We knew that BMW was working on LTE integration last year with its ConnectedDrive, and we've been told that, by the end of 2015, most General Motors products will have it, but LTE can be ordered on the S3 Sportback (pictured) as soon as July. Other models in the A3 line-up will add the option in November.


The fact that the brand-new prototype three-cylinder, 1.5-liter gasoline engine from BMW finds itself in a 1 Series is almost accidental. Heidelinde Holzer, who works on powertrain predevelopment, powertrain functions and powertrain integration, told AutoblogGreen her team simply took the cars that were available. After all, when you're working on engines that are not destined to go into any vehicles in the near future – this has been a four-year project already – it's okay to test t


General Motors isn't the first automaker to deliver in-car Internet access, but a proposed plan announced today could make the technology more widespread than any of its competitors have offered. By the 2015 model year, most Chevrolet, Buick, Cadillac and GMC products in the US and Canada will offer 4G LTE mobile broadband access. Initially, GM will just be pairing with AT&T to deliver this service, but additional carriers will be revealed in the future.


Do you want a reliable GPS signal or blazing 4G data speeds? According to a pair of engineers at Garmin International, you might be able to get one, but not both.


Verizon rolled out its 4G LTE network late last year to 38 major metro areas and now Detroit can count itself among the latest to get Big Red's zippy wireless broadband service. But why the push now?


Less than a month after Audi head Rupert Stadler announced plans to bring LTE 4G to its vehicles, the automaker has its first working prototype. And in comes in the form of the Audi A8.


Sure. We're all waiting in breathless anticipation for 4G LTE to make it to our cars, but Korea's Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute has already managed to port LTE-Advanced into an RV.


Even though Verizon rolled out its 4G LTE service early last month, CES was wireless broadband's coming out party. Along with unveiling a handful 4G-capable devices, Verizon approached General Motors' OnStar division to create a rolling showcase of what a wireless broadband-equipped vehicle could be capable of. The key word is could. While everything OnStar developed is feasible, it's not hitting the market anytime soon. It's simply a showcase of what's possible, if not probable.


Ford may have been the dominant force at CES for the last few years, but other automakers are finally beginning to take the consumer electronics space seriously. Although Alan Mulally's keynote this morning represented an unprecedented third address at the show, Audi CEO Rupert Stadler kicked things off Wednesday morning, showing off a new MMI interface and touting its partnership with chip-maker NVIDIA. But that wasn't the biggest news.

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