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Ford Motor Company announced Wednesday that it has posted a $1 billion profit for the second quarter of 2012. That sounds like good news for the Blue Oval, until you take into account that Ford posted a $2.4 billion profit for Q2 a year ago. That is a substantial 58 percent loss.

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Automotive News reports Honda is currently limiting shipments of models like the Fit, CR-Z and Insight due to Japan's strong yen. The automaker admits it is currently losing money on every Japanese-built model it sells in the U.S. with the exchange rate currently at 80 yen per dollar. Honda is currently working to move more production to North America and source more components from this side of the Pacific, though such a shift will take time. In the interim, the manufacturer is carefully alloca

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What a difference a few years make. Back in 2009, Ford Motor Company's North American operations were dragging down its earnings. The company reported a net loss of $1.4 billion in that year's first quarter when market share in the U.S. was falling but rising overseas. The situation today, however, is the mirror opposite.

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Tesla Motors is happy with its third quarter results, which show a ten-percent increase in revenue from last quarter's $28.4 million up to $31.2 million, improved gross margin to 30 percent (from 22 percent previously) and a net loss of $34.9 million compared to its second quarter figure of $38.5 million. While all this is an improvement from last quarter, the large net losses this year stem mostly from development costs associated with the upcoming Model S sedan, planned to launch in 2012. R&am

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Tesla Motors is happy with its third quarter results, which boast a 10 percent increase in revenue from last quarter's $28.4 million to $31.2 million, an improved gross margin of 30 percent from 22 percent previously, and a net loss of $34.9 million compared to its second quarter figure of $38.5 million. While an improvement from just a quarter ago, the large net losses this year stem mostly from development costs associated with the upcoming Model S sedan, which is planned for launch in 2012. R

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They're called owner "give-ups," and their rise is a sign of the tough economic times. Despondent over being financially strapped and unable to cover car payments, vehicle owners are ditching, sinking, or torching their vehicles and reporting the loss to collect insurance payoffs. According to authorities, most of the titleholders aren't seasoned criminals. In fact, many of the false claims are filed by first-time offenders -- people who normally wouldn't steal a piece of candy from a store. How

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An operating loss of ¥283.0 billion ($2.91 billion at current exchange rates) for the period ending March 31 represents Honda Motor Company's first quarterly loss in 15 years. To put that into proper perspective, that was when Honda was plying the 1994 model year Accord wagon shown above.

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Steven Landry, Chrysler veep of North American sales, was speaking to a group of business students at St. Mary's University when he said that Chrysler will be taking in $64 billion in revenue this year and would spend $65 billion. It doesn't take an MBA to figure out that those quoted figures put Chrysler $1 billion in the red for 2007. Andrea MacDonald for The Daily News was at the ceremony and filed the report, but when Automotive News tried to contact Chrysler's PR people, they declined to co

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While there were some R8s that burned in the development phase, Audi worked hard to massage the platform and make it production ready. These pictures are reportedly a mule, not a production R8 that went up in flames. Scuttlebutt has it that fuel spillage was the culprit here, though speculation of something else is also offered if you click through and read the related thread on the R8talk forum. Either way, it's a tragic end to this particular R8's short life. Of course, in the end, it's only a

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Today Ford will report its second quarter earnings for 2007, and analysts expect the Blue Oval to ink another losing quarter in the books for the eighth time in a row. The No. 2 automaker in the U.S., for now, lost $282 million in Q1, and analysts expect Ford's aggressive use of incentives to sell cars, as well as the ever rising cost of materials, to again hurt the bottom line to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars.

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DaimlerChrysler has published its preliminary Group and divisional results for the year 2006 revealing that the organisation spent $7.0 billion for the year on research and development. This figure was down from $7.5 billion in the previous year but included the further development of powertrain technologies, alternative propulsion systems such as hybrid drive and fuel cells, and electronic systems for the improvement of vehicle safety.

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There have been rumblings of late in the halls of Stuttgart that the boys in Auburn Hills are an albatross around the neck of DCX. Dieter Zetsche and company are reportedly in it for the long haul and fighting the good fight for Chrysler, but investors cite thin patience while waiting for a profit. Rumors of potential suitors waiting in the wings abound, but it seems that the real problem would be salability due to large pension commitments. Some have gone as far as speculating that even if Chry

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Alex Nunez joins Damon and myself again on the 46th episode of the Autoblog podcast. Lately it seems like the podcast wouldn't be official unless we talked about Ford, and this week keeps the Blue Oval streak alive with a conversation of Ford's performance (or lack thereof) in the third quarter of 2006. I wouldn't let the podcast this week happen unless my colleagues also agreed to talk about the final Ford Taurus being built and the George plant that produces being closed. Spy shots of the HUMM

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The Chrysler Group is stepping in line with Ford today, which earlier announced more buyouts for Blue Oval workers, plant closings and that it won't see a profit in North America until 2009 at the earliest, to announce that it has increased the amount it expects to lose in the third quarter by almost $1 billion to a total of $1.5 billion. Citing a laundry list of reasons mirroring those that also caught Ford by surprise, including high fuel prices, lack of a competitive small vehicle lineup and

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Mark Fields – "If we have to move faster and cut deeper, we will."

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