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Commercial truck and bus fleets in the United States are becoming keenly interested in running their vehicles on liquid propane (LPG), as this column reported back in March. That's because propane prices are substantially below those for gasoline or diesel, or even for compressed natural gas (CNG). Moreover, LPG provides substantial savings in maintenance costs and up to a 50-percent reduction in CO2 emissions. Now, the question is, will LPG catch on with everyday drivers and not just commercial

Two of the leading producers of propane-injection systems for light-duty and medium-duty vehicles – Cleanfuel USA and Roush – have received Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval for their new-vehicle systems.

LPG has come to the masses massive, with ROUSH introducing a conversion for the Ford F-250. The changes are minimal: fuel tank and pump, stainless steel fuel lines, aluminum fuel rails and PCM calibration. They'll mean cheaper running costs but no loss of horsepower, torque or towing capacity. Depending on which conversion you choose, though, you could lose bed capacity: an under bed tank provides a 250-mile range, or a 62-gallon tank that goes in the bed means 500 miles of running.

Click above for more shots of the Greenfly LPG motorcycle

In some countries, LPG (liquified propane gas) is an increasingly common fuel for automobiles due to its comparatively low cost and 15-20 percent lower emissions compared to gasoline or diesel fuel. Though some are against the practice, a few governments encourage the use of LPG through lowered taxes. In America, propane for automotive use is usually limited to large fleets, where the specialized pumping equipment can be cost effectively purchased. As we mentioned before, Roush has decided to ta

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