60 Articles
1 / 3
NEXT
22Automakers stuck on structural adhesives for new cars

The biggest benefit of adhesives is that they allow automakers to mix and match structural materials.

AddAluminum lightweighting does, in fact, save fuel

When the best-selling US truck sheds the equivalent weight of three football fullbacks by shifting to aluminum, folks start paying attention. Oak Ridge National Laboratory took a closer look at whether the reduced fuel consumption from a lighter aluminum body makes up for the fact that producing aluminum is far more energy intensive than steel. And the results of the study are pretty encouraging.

AddChrysler will study EVs, lightweight tech with Canadian universities

Chrysler may have been relatively late to the game when it came to vehicle powertrain electrification, but the US automaker is looking to play some catch-up with a little help from north of the border. Chrysler will work with McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, at accelerating the development of electric powertrains while working with other Canadian entities on developing lighter metal materials, Automotive News says.

AddBlast from the past: Volvo LCP 2000, Light Component Project offered 60 mpg in 1983

Trips down green car memory lane are always fun, both because we learn something about the past and because all the things that have been tried before illuminate all the things that are being tried now. Whether we're looking at 40 years of electric vehicles at BMW or the controversial history of the EV1, there are some fascinating stories back there. The latest case in point is the Volvo LCP 2000, which turned 30 years old this week.

Add2015 Toyota Prius rumors start flowing

Toyota has already picked the low-hanging fruit when it comes to boosting the Prius hybrid's fuel economy. But the Japanese automaker's planning on climbing a little further up that tree.

AddFord, Dow Chemical partner on carbon fiber composites, hope to shed up to 750 pounds

Ford is getting religion when it comes to light-weighting its vehicles. The company has entered into a new partnership with Dow Chemical to develop carbon fiber that can be manufactured at affordable prices for high-volume applications. That, of course, is the holy grail of weight reduction, which is why other manufacturers like BMW and General Motors are also partnering with suppliers to try and achieve the same ends.

56Ford, Dow Chemical partner on carbon fiber composites, hope to shed up to 750 pounds

Ford is getting religion when it comes to light-weighting its vehicles. The company has entered into a new partnership with Dow Chemical to develop carbon fiber that can be manufactured at affordable prices for high-volume applications. That, of course, is the holy grail of weight reduction, which is why other manufacturers like General Motors are also partnering with suppliers to try and achieve the same ends.

AddAuto applications sought for new advanced metal that's 100x lighter than Styrofoam [w/video]

Automakers are being pinched to increase safety and improve fuel efficiency, but those two goals often work against each other. That could change thanks to a material that is 99.99-percent air.

46Auto applications sought for new advanced metal that's 100x lighter than Styrofoam [w/video]

Automakers are being pinched to increase safety and improve fuel efficiency, but those two goals often work against each other. That could change thanks to a material that is 99.99-percent air.

AddGM opens Advanced Technical center in Shanghai, site to focus on components for hybrid vehicles

Recently, General Motors celebrated the launch of Phase 1 at its China Advanced Technical Center in Shanghai. The facility, which is adjacent to GM International Operations and GM China Headquarters, is the automaker's latest bid to grab a greater slice of the clean energy vehicle segment.

AddLightweight automotive material segment to soar to $95 billion in 2017

With the 2025 CAFE target set at 54.5 miles per gallon, the race to develop fuel-efficient vehicles is on. According to Frost & Sullivan, this race to 54.5 will necessitate a healthy dose of lightweight automotive components.

AddDOE awards $175 million for development of advanced vehicle technologies

Can you build a better car for $175 million? The U.S. Department of Energy hopes so, and Secretary Steven Chu has announced that the DOE will award more than that amount over the next three to five years to accelerate the development and deployment of advanced vehicle technologies. The funds will be distributed to 40 projects in 15 states with the overall goal is to improve the fuel efficiency of next-generation vehicles.

AddGraphene composite material is thin like paper, 10 to 13 times stronger than steel

In work recently published in the Journal of Applied Physics, a University of Technology Sydney (UTS) team led by professor Guoxiu Wang presented reproducible test results showing that graphene paper has the potential to revolutionize the automotive industry. How? Well, researchers at UTS have milled raw graphite by purifying and filtering it with chemicals to reshape and reform it into graphene nanosheets. We should explain.

AddIs carbon fiber really a "green" solution to reduce vehicle weight?

BMW and Mercedes are leading the way in using carbon fiber to reduce weight in future passenger vehicles. Losing pounds can also be key to meet upcoming CAFE regulations and can also help increase the range electric vehicles can travel. The shift towards carbon fiber will probably become more widespread throughout the automotive industry as companies realize the weight-saving benefits of this product versus steel. Though carbon fiber is touted for its low weight, a new report by Toyota and repor

22Following BMW, Daimler announces carbon fiber future ahead for Mercedes

2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG – Click above for high-res image gallery

1 / 3
NEXT