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Senator Carl Levin of Michigan, dubbed the "Auto Industry's Best Friend," is practicing what he preaches. The long-serving senator is now the proud owner of a Volt, the first sold by the LaFontaine Chevrolet dealership. Excited about his new purchase, Levin said:


This'd be a sweet deal for automakers. At a kick-off event for the DC Auto Show today, Representative Sander Levin (D-Royal Oak, MI, pictured) said he will introduce a bill to increase the limit on how many plug-in vehicles an automaker can sell before the $7,500 (max) tax credit expires from 200,000 to 500,000. Sander's younger brother, Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI) will introduce the bill in the Senate.


According to the real-time counter on the homepage of the National Biodiesel Board (NBB), it's been 108 days since the $1.00 per gallon biodiesel tax credit expired. With an entire industry stalled and no clear end to the biodiesel purgatory in sight, more and more groups are petitioning their legislators to bring the tax credit back. Most recently, the National Association of Truckstop Operators (NATSO) added its voice to the growing roar of angry alt-fuel proponents.


Senator Carl Levin (D-MI) is moving again to protect the interests of his biggest constituents (that is, the auto industry) by pushing for the changes to the energy bill passed by the senate. If Levin gets his way, the bill would more closely resemble the Hill-Terry bill in the House of Representatives. Under Levin's proposals, the split between cars and trucks that was left out of the Senate proposal would be restored.


In the Wild West, the order would have been "Cut them off at the pass!" For carmakers today battling with wildly fluctuating forecasts for mpg, CO2, and CAFE standards, the mission is to cut them off at the Capital. Taking matters upon themselves, some manufacturers are considering a proposal that would require 36 mpg for cars and 30 mpg for light trucks.

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