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BMW and VW will work with ChargePoint to get more DC Fast Chargers up and ready on the East and West coasts of the US. More Level 2 chargers will be available, too.

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CarCharging Group Wants To Add Model S Adapters To Level 2 Stations

The first public bite on Tesla open casting call for its electric vehicle patents has been made by CarCharging, which says it wants to integrate the California automaker's EV charging tech into the Blink Network. Now, this does not mean that Blink chargers will soon be able to Supercharge. Instead, Blink wants to add Tesla-capable adapters to its charging stations. CarCharging and Blink can do this because Tesla CEO Elon Musk has stated that, "Tesla will not initiate patent lawsuits against anyo

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We doubt AeroVironment wants to put electric-vehicle charging-station installers out of business, but the company's new product does give plug-in drivers, not to mention a few retailers, the option of skipping the part where you call a contractor. Meet the TurboCord.

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"But wait, there's more!" Anyone who's watched late-night television is familiar with the telltale phrase of a spokesman looking to reel in a potential customer who may otherwise be disinterested in what's being advertised. Now, General Motors, faced with selling the first Cadillac extended-range plug-in vehicle to a public that may find it rather expensive, is throwing in a bonus. In this case, GM will give away a 240-volt home fast charger to "early" buyers of the Cadillac ELR, including profe

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ClipperCreek may not be offering the least expensive Level 2 home-charging station on the US market, as it says it is, but it's not too far off the mark and gives the Golden State something to be proud of. The California-based company just starting selling its HCS-40 product, a 30-amp, 240-volt Level 2 charging station with a retail price of $590. The station is indoor-outdoor rated, includes a 25-foot long cable and comes equipped with a three-year warranty. ClipperCreek says installation is pr

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A slow charge is better than no charge, but the state of California and some of its largest cities don't seem to understand that concept. That's the crux of an argument from Plugs and Cars' Marc Geller (a former contributor to AutoblogGreen), who cites the case of a Nissan Leaf-owning San Francisco police officer who had charging privileges at a Level 1 (i.e., a standard 120-volt) outlet at an employee-only lot taken away, all in the name of public policy.

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In Blink electric-vehicle charging-station maker Ecotality's case, less juice from the banks and government means less juice for its customers. A funding shortfall is forcing Ecotality to address a software glitch within approximately 12,000 stations by reducing the power they supply to plugged-in plug-in vehicles.

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When you run the smallest state in the nation (by geography), there's really no excuse for range anxiety to be an issue. Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee may have thought as much when he announced that his state will add 50 publicly accessible electric-vehicle charging stations this summer.

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US plug-in vehicle drivers have public access to about 180 more charging stations than they did a month ago, as the rate of additional station deployments appears to be settling at about 200 units a month.

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One Illinois-based company is taking the "slow and steady wins the race" approach to public plug-in vehicle chargers. Telefonix, which has specialized in making retractable cord reels largely used in the aviation industry, is looking to drum up interest in its L1 Power Post, which is what the company says will be the first Level 1 charging station designed for public use, according to Plug In Cars.

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Ford figures that 11,000 electric-vehicle driving homeowners can't be wrong. The US automaker has tapped AeroVironment as its official vendor for Level 2 home-charging systems.

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For the average car shopping consumer (such as me), one of the real deal breakers with plug-in electric vehicles has been the cost of the home charger. Sure, they're getting cheaper at Home Depot, but when you're talking about buying the charger and having it installed in your garage, it's around $1,500 to $2,000 extra. What if you could have that cost added to your finance package and monthly payments at the dealership?

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About 170 publicly accessible electric-vehicle charging stations were installed in the US last month. If this trend continues, the number of EV stations could grow at about 40 percent a year, according to US Department of Energy figures.

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Shopping for a 240-volt, Level 2 wall-mounted electric car charging unit? Then check out Home Depot's online shopping site, where consumers get to choose a variety of units with prices that start at $749 and top off at $9,815.

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As advanced as the powertrain in the all-electric Toyota RAV4 EV is, it is having problems with some public Level 2 charging stations. Cindy Knight, the public affairs manager for environmental, safety and quality communications at Toyota Motor Sales, USA, confirmed to AutoblogGreen that a technical bulletin went out to dealers dated October 30 that the following charging stations have "basic compatibility" with the RAV4 EV (i.e., these ones work):

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Sometime during the first quarter of 2012, SAE International says it will officially establish a worldwide standard, calling for an integrated coupler for plug-in vehicles. The SAE says this J1772 combo coupler will allow plug-in vehicles to be charged from either a conventional, 15-amp AC wall outlet or a DC connection of up to 90 kilowatts.

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Showcased during the Plug-in 2011 Conference, Coulomb Technologies has revealed two of its latest additions to its ChargePoint networked charging station lineup. Both chargers – dual-port Level 2 models based on Coulomb's CT2020 – provide two 7.2-kilowatt ports and have been specifically designed for the North American market. With the CT2025, charging is delivered via two standard SAE J1772 connectors attached to self-retracting cords. The CT2021 (pictured) makes due without the win

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The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a funding opportunity for up to $12 million to develop and produce next-gen

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Leviton's Evr-Green 160 Level 2 home charging station, which is slated to hit the U.S. market in mid-April, has received Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) approval from the Underwriters Laboratories (UL). The Evr-Green 160 cranks out up to 16 amps at 240 volts, corresponding to 3.8kW of juice, and will be offered in two forms: a patent-pending plug-in version designed for do-it-yourself installation and a more conventional hardwired setup.

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