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35Parents using Uber as child carpool alternative [w/poll]

Some kids ride home from school in a school bus. Others get picked up by their parents or nannies, or by carpool with other parents. Some walk or ride their bikes, or take public transportation. But Baily Deeter of Atherton, CA, simply hits a button on his iPhone and orders a cab from Uber.

AddFourth Grader Thwarts Carjacking In Texas

Youngster hailed as a hero after calling for help

Last week, a 9-year-old boy in Houston, Texas, saved himself and several other kids from a car-jacking criminal by calling 911.

331Kids Group Wants White House To Address Hot-Car Deaths

An average of 38 children die each year in the United States from vehicular heatstroke

Kids and Cars, a nonprofit organization that advocates for children's traffic safety, is asking the federal government to provide funds for research and development of technology that can detect a child left in the rear seat of a vehicle.

90Kids group wants White House to address hot-car deaths

Cars come equipped with alarms that remind motorists to buckle their seatbelts, chimes that indicate headlights are still on after the engine is turned off and buzzers that sound if keys are left in the ignition, says Janette Fennell. Forget a sleeping child in the rear seats, however, and drivers are on their own.

54Dad pleads with parents to remember kids in hot cars

After five minutes of sitting in a hot car, Terry Williams was drenched with sweat. After ten minutes, he felt like the air had been sucked out of his lungs. After 15 minutes, he got out of the car.

30Cases Of Kids Dying In Hot Cars All Too Common

They're normally tragic accidents; Georgia case may be rare exception

The circumstances surrounding the death of a Georgia toddler in a hot car last month are macabre. Authorities say Justin Ross Harris, 33, may have left his 22-month-old son, Cooper, in the family's car for more than seven hours on purpose while temperatures in Cobb County, Georgia, reached 92 degrees.

196Kids Are Still Dying After Being Left In Hot Cars

An uptick in incidents suggests 2013 may be on track for tragic year

A child dies every nine days in the U.S. after being left too long in a hot car, according to the advocacy group Kids And Cars.

13Batman and Dale Earnhardt Jr. car baby seats are kind of creepy, kind of cool

If you're looking for a different way to ferry your children about in the car safely, KidsEmbrace may have you covered. The company makes specialty car seats fashioned after DC Comics superhero Batman and NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Junior.

AddTwo Kids Save Runaway Car After Father Loses Consciousness

When their father lost consciousness behind the wheel, the two pre-teens took control

A terrifying ride for two pre-teens ended without incident after their quick thinking saved them and their father from a potential high speed crash.

471Police: Drunk Indiana Man Strapped 4 Children To Hood Of Car

Journey began in liquor store parking lot

Just when you thought poor Seamus Romney had it bad when he was packed like a piece of luggage on the car roof for a family vacation, along comes a story that makes Mitt Romney look like a doting dog owner.

33Corvette Z06 bed upgrades your childhood

We've reported plenty on items we'd like to place in our automotive-themed dream house, from engine-block coffee tables and Pininfarina desks to Aston Martin loveseats and Porsche sofas – but most of them are for the living room. We'd be remised, however, to forget the one part of the house where the fascination all began: our childhood bedroom.

85Toxic chemicals found in over half of children's car seats

Car seats are undoubtedly a must-have if you want to keep your child safe in the car. Yet, as with so many other things, they can hide surprises that you might want your child to avoid. In this case the surprise is chemicals that, according to HealthyStuff.org, possess "known toxicity, persistence, and tendency to build up in people and the environment." They include bromine, chlorine and lead, among others.

45Teaching kids how to steal cars is a good idea

A recent workshop in Los Angeles offers something special for interested children: a class on the mechanics of car theft. Created by the non-profit organization Machine Project, the workshop is entitled "The Good Kids' Guide to Being a Bit Bad: Cars edition." It covers the topics of hot wiring, opening a locked door and getting out of a locked trunk... and we fully support the class.

5You Know, For the Kids: Volvo Motorsport launches children's racing gear

Volvo Motorsport Collection – Click above for high-res image gallery

Add"Daddy, read me a story" - the Doe's EV children's book

The Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels Data Center website has a children's book. It's called call Daniel and His Electric Car. It's a story about a boy and his father buying a car. I won't spoil the ending but you can probably guess what happens. Wink, wink :D

7Town & Country, Jimmy Neutron edition

It's better than Lee Iacocca saying something like "fo shizzle." Chrysler has joined up with Nickelodeon to shill their newly revamped minivans. With the addition of Sirius TV to beam content off the birds and into the backseat, it makes perfect sense for the two to team up. I'd rather interact with our child, but some parents just need a break from their little monsters, and video screens in the back seem to shut them up for a while. Cartoon characters have been used to sell cars before; even t

8Ridemakerz coming to a mall near you

Great, another retail establishment that can't spell. Here's a tip: "Z" does not equal "S." Using Z to pluralize words will also not make you hip or cool. Rather, it will point out that it's an obvious stab at being cool, without actually attaining coolness. Alphabet abuse aside, the concept of RideMakerz is cool. From the soft, cuddly folks at Build-A-Bear Workshop (and Chip Foose, natch) comes a less fluffy, more greasy idea. Those of us who spent hours inhaling Testor's model glue fumes final

4Second generation air bags safer for kids, still safe for adults

Reuters reports that second-generation air bags are less risky for children while still providing appropriate levels of safety for larger adults. The development is a vast improvement upon earlier generation air bags, which were developed to protect an average size male and could be lethal for smaller adults and children.

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