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In a display that warmed a grieving family's heart, hundreds of truck owners showed up to the funeral of a little boy last Friday who's rare disease never dimmed his loved of big rigs.


Two New Jersey police officers are being hailed as heroes after saving the life of a child left in a hot minivan in a Costco parking lot last week.


This five year old has the perfect look on his face while going drifting with his stunt-driver dad. The two of them make an annual tradition out of doing this.


A woman in Kansas smashed open a car window over the weekend to rescue a toddler trapped inside the sweltering vehicle.


To highlight the danger kids face during the summer Kars4Kids gave six adults a simple challenge: sit in a hot car for 10 minutes, win $100 bucks.


On a holiday that's supposed to celebrate mothers, one mom was panicking. Her son was inside her car when it was stolen. Then, 4-year-old Peyton jumped out.


Some kids ride home from school in a school bus. Others get picked up by their parents or nannies, or by carpool with other parents. Some walk or ride their bikes, or take public transportation. But Baily Deeter of Atherton, CA, simply hits a button on his iPhone and orders a cab from Uber.


Youngster hailed as a hero after calling for help

Last week, a 9-year-old boy in Houston, Texas, saved himself and several other kids from a car-jacking criminal by calling 911.


An average of 38 children die each year in the United States from vehicular heatstroke

Kids and Cars, a nonprofit organization that advocates for children's traffic safety, is asking the federal government to provide funds for research and development of technology that can detect a child left in the rear seat of a vehicle.


Cars come equipped with alarms that remind motorists to buckle their seatbelts, chimes that indicate headlights are still on after the engine is turned off and buzzers that sound if keys are left in the ignition, says Janette Fennell. Forget a sleeping child in the rear seats, however, and drivers are on their own.


After five minutes of sitting in a hot car, Terry Williams was drenched with sweat. After ten minutes, he felt like the air had been sucked out of his lungs. After 15 minutes, he got out of the car.


They're normally tragic accidents; Georgia case may be rare exception

The circumstances surrounding the death of a Georgia toddler in a hot car last month are macabre. Authorities say Justin Ross Harris, 33, may have left his 22-month-old son, Cooper, in the family's car for more than seven hours on purpose while temperatures in Cobb County, Georgia, reached 92 degrees.


An uptick in incidents suggests 2013 may be on track for tragic year

A child dies every nine days in the U.S. after being left too long in a hot car, according to the advocacy group Kids And Cars.


If you're looking for a different way to ferry your children about in the car safely, KidsEmbrace may have you covered. The company makes specialty car seats fashioned after DC Comics superhero Batman and NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Junior.


When their father lost consciousness behind the wheel, the two pre-teens took control

A terrifying ride for two pre-teens ended without incident after their quick thinking saved them and their father from a potential high speed crash.


Journey began in liquor store parking lot

Just when you thought poor Seamus Romney had it bad when he was packed like a piece of luggage on the car roof for a family vacation, along comes a story that makes Mitt Romney look like a doting dog owner.


We've reported plenty on items we'd like to place in our automotive-themed dream house, from engine-block coffee tables and Pininfarina desks to Aston Martin loveseats and Porsche sofas – but most of them are for the living room. We'd be remised, however, to forget the one part of the house where the fascination all began: our childhood bedroom.


Car seats are undoubtedly a must-have if you want to keep your child safe in the car. Yet, as with so many other things, they can hide surprises that you might want your child to avoid. In this case the surprise is chemicals that, according to HealthyStuff.org, possess "known toxicity, persistence, and tendency to build up in people and the environment." They include bromine, chlorine and lead, among others.


A recent workshop in Los Angeles offers something special for interested children: a class on the mechanics of car theft. Created by the non-profit organization Machine Project, the workshop is entitled "The Good Kids' Guide to Being a Bit Bad: Cars edition." It covers the topics of hot wiring, opening a locked door and getting out of a locked trunk... and we fully support the class.


Volvo Motorsport Collection – Click above for high-res image gallery

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