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8GM ignition switch recall fund reaches 100 approved claims for deaths, injuries

The General Motors ignition switch compensation fund has the macabre task of determining whether to pay settlements to those hurt by the automaker's faulty parts. The group, led by attorney Kenneth Feinberg, has been accepting claims since August 1, and the latest statistics have brought to light quite a grisly figure. It has now offered 100 people remuneration for injuries or deaths due to the bad switches.

1GM extends deadline on ignition-switch compensation

Victims of faulty ignition switches in General Motors vehicles have been given an additional month to apply for compensation. This comes as administrator Kenneth Feinberg and his team increase their efforts to reach those potentially eligible for recompense under the program. The deadline, which was previously set for the last day of this calendar year, has now been extended to January 31, 2015.

8GM approval for ignition-switch death claims hits 30

With nearly 1,600 claims in the General Motors faulty ignition switch compensation fund as of Friday, The Detroit News is reporting the company has so far approved 30 out of 193 death claims and 31 out of 184 injury claims. In all, the total claims at the end of last week were up four percent, while the approved death and injury claims have jumped up from 29 and 27, respectively. The remaining 1,286 claims are for less-serious injuries, a figure that is up to 1,240 from the previous week.

40GM ignition-switch recall death toll rises to 27

When General Motors began addressing the ignition switch debacle earlier this year, it estimated that 13 people had died due to its negligence in replacing the faulty component. That figure, however, has more than doubled by now.

17GM compensation fund finds at least 19 deaths related to faulty ignition switches [w/video]

It appears that the safety problems stemming from General Motors' faulty ignition switches may stretch further than the automaker as admitted to. In a new interview with CNN Money, Kenneth Feinberg, the lawyer overseeing the settlement process for GM, says that there are at least 19 deaths and 12 injuries being compensated so far. That's more than the 13 fatalities originally claimed by the automaker.

40Death claim in GM ignition-switch lawsuit rises to 100

Nearly 300 people have filed claims in the General Motors ignition switch recall case, with around 100 claiming the defect led to their loved ones' fatal crashes while 184 people claim they were injured in crashes caused by the recalled ignition switch. The period for filing claims opened on August 1.

23GM won't pay ignition-switch claims out of insurance funds

"It will be done through cash on hand, no insurance." – David Roman, GM's director of financial communications.

14Ken Feinberg details General Motors' ignition switch recall compensation plan [UPDATE]

Kenneth Feinberg and General Motors have announced the long-awaited compensation plan for victims of the Detroit-based manufacturer's botched ignition switch recall.

28GM won't pay owners of recalled cars for lost value

Kenneth Feinberg, the man in charge of the General Motors compensation fund dealing with the its widespread ignition switch woes, has issued an informal, two-letter response to the plaintiffs in more than 70 lawsuits seeking redress for lost resale value of their Cobalts: "No." The cases were recently combined into one, but Feinberg told The Detroit News that the fund will deal "only with death and physical injury claims," and that "perceived diminished value" will get no consideration.

15GM begins compensation negotiations with ignition switch victims

The process of settling the plethora of lawsuits stemming from General Motors' ignition switch recall has begun in earnest, as GM lawyer Kenneth Feinberg met with Robert Hilliard, an attorney for some 300 people and families affected by the recall.

36General Motors CEO provides few details in appearance before Congress

It was only two months ago that Mary Barra, freshly crowned as the new General Motors chief executive officer, visited Washington DC as an esteemed guest of First Lady Michelle Obama for the State of the Union address.

76Feds cut executive pay at General Motors, Chrysler

The United States Treasury Department, under the direction of pay czar Kenneth Feinberg (pictured) has cut the total cash compensation for the top 25 executives at both General Motors and Chrysler, among other companies who received bailout assistance under the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). On average, the overall compensation for 2010 is down 15 percent versus 2009.

50Report: GM CEO could earn $9M per year, ex-CEO Henderson hired as $60k/month consultant

Two different outlets are reporting two seemingly conflicting reports about pay at General Motors, but it's clear regardless of the details that money is in motion at The General. Ed Whitacre, Jr., who doesn't receive any pay as GM's chairman, is waiting on approval from the Treasury pay czar for a $9 million "pay package" for his recent move to CEO. The pay has been "approved 'in principle'," but we aren't sure when it's going to be paid.

52Fed may reconsider $500k salary cap for new GM CEO, limit pay for 2nd tier execs

It's official: pay czar Kenneth Feinberg's executive compensation rules for companies yet to return their bailout funds means a cap of $500K for second-tier executives. Importantly, that number represents the total compensation allowed, but only 45 percent of it -- $225,000, can be in cold, hard ducats. Stock remuneration must be held or paid out over at least two years, and extracurricular perks like country club memberships and private jet escapades can be valued at no more than $25,000.

9REPORT: Chrysler Financial to wind down by 2011, executive pay, well, not so much

Cerberus submitted its plans for Chrysler Financial to the U.S. Treasury, and then in an announcement that came as a surprise to Cerberus itself, the Treasury said that Chrysler Financial would be shutting down by December 31, 2011. The lending arm paid back its $1.5 billion loan from the government's TARP program, but much of its dealer financing and loan operations were replaced by GMAC.

70REPORT: Pay czar planning up to 90% compensation cuts for top auto execs

When General Motors and Chrysler took money from the U.S. government to prevent being consigned to history, the two storied domestic automakers had no choice but to put their fates in Uncle Sam's hands. After two very brief bankruptcies and billions in bailout cash, America's favorite bearded relative is looking to take its own pound of flesh.

26Officially Official: Chrysler exiting bankruptcy, Fiat steps in and makes changes immediately

Fiat now owns a big chunk of Chrysler. Officially. Soon after the Supreme Court gave it the go-ahead, the sale of Chrysler to Fiat was complete. Altogether, the deal took just 42 days. With a couple of signatures and a wire transfer Wednesday morning, the sale was official. Fiat gets most of Chrysler's assets and $6.6 billion in "exit financing" from the federal government.

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