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A little over a month since launching its IPO on the New York Stock Exchange, Ferrari applied to list its stock on the Borsa Italiana in Milan.


The Ferrari IPO is oversubscribed throughout its price range, investors telling banks that the potential 18.89 million shares on offer won't come close to satisfying demand.


Ferrari is officially launching its initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange, where it will be listed under the symbol RACE.


Ferrari is set to launch its Initial Public Offering on the stock exchange. But will the shares be able to keep up with the investment value of a classic Ferrari?


Ferrari has filed the necessary paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission to launch the company's IPO later in the year. The documents don't set a specific timeframe for the offering or price for the shares.


Sergio Marchionne figures Ferrari is worth $11 billion. Yes, that's right: billion, with a B. And we'll soon find out as the company's IPO is just around the corner.


If you're planning on buying Ferrari stocks, don't plan on getting them before Columbus Day, as the parent FCA has pushed the IPO off until after October 12.


Piero Ferrari reportedly rules out selling any of the shares his family still holds in the company his father founded, despite the IPO which its parent company Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is launching.


Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is trying to get capital together in a hurry to finance the automaker's growth plans. Among its strategies to raise money, Ferrari will be spun off from the FCA mothership next year with an initial public offering. However, the Italian supercar maker will be a couple billion dollars poorer at the start of its new life.


The merged Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is targeting October 13 to launch its initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange, CEO Sergio Marchionne told reporters assembled for a meeting in Rimini, Italy.


Israel-based vehicle safety technology company Mobileye (NYSE: MBLY) has successfully launched its Initial Public Offering on the New York Stock Exchange, raising approximately $890 million to value the company at a reported $5.3 billion.


Chrysler and Fiat able to merge without initial public offering of stock

Italian automaker Fiat SpA announced Wednesday that it reached an agreement to acquire the remaining shares of Chrysler for $3.65 billion in payments to a union-controlled trust fund.


There will not be a Chrysler IPO in 2013. Fiat, according to a report from Forbes, has announced that it will not be able to make the American brand's initial public offering before the end of the year, saying that the short, five-week window that makes up the rest of 2013 is "not practicable."


Brammo CEO Craig Bramscher is looking to take a few plays from the Tesla Motors playbook by using its electric-vehicle wizardry to go public, and even plans to go after the same investment bankers that helped the California automaker with its IPO three years ago.


The four-year relationship between Fiat and Chrysler has thus far been beneficial for both automakers, but it has also proven to be a complicated battle between Sergio Marchionne and the United Auto Workers – the latter controlling the remaining 41.5 percent of Chrysler. With the recent filing for a US IPO, it looks like Marchionne and the UAW appear to be playing a billion-dollar game of chicken, with both sides far apart on how much the union's shares are worth. If it comes down to Chrys


Chrysler has had a lot of owners over the past few years alone, from Daimler to Cerberus to Fiat and the federal government. But it could be poised to gain some more before long. Like, a lot more.


Mitsubishi makes the brilliantly fast, wonderfully fun Lancer Evolution. Outside of that road-going rally car, the rest of the range is pretty poor - the new Outlander isn't bad, but the subcompact Mirage looks like might've been competitive five years ago, while the Galant and Lancer have suffered from serial neglect.


At the moment, Fiat is in court with the United Auto Workers, waiting for the justice system to provide some guidance on a fair price for 41.5-percent of Chrysler it doesn't own. Fiat owns 58.5 percent of the company and wishes to buy the remainder, which is owned by the union's VEBA retiree trust, but the Italian company and the UAW are on different sides of the galaxy when it comes to assigning a fair price to that outstanding stake.


Mascoma, a cellulosic ethanol maker, has been working on gaining capital investment from just about every funding source out there. But now it looks like the attempts to go public and raise $100 million have been pulled off the market.


The automaker will either be traded or fully merged with Fiat

Chrysler and Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne is nothing if not cagey. When the CEO out-maneuvered the White House in 2009 to strike a great deal to take-over Chrysler with U.S. government loans, it was considered a forgone conclusion that he would eventually take the company public in an initial-public offering. Now, the CEO says an ipo is merely 50-50.


Unless Tesla Motors can secure outside funding, the company will be in dire financial straits during 2013, says MarketWatch tech investor John Shinal. In fact, if Tesla hadn't received hundreds of millions of dollars from the federal government in 2012, its financials would already be gasping for air, he said.

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