12 Articles
1 / 1
Add

2010 Mercury Milan Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

22

2010 Ford Taurus SHO - Click above for high-res image gallery

20

IIHS crash tests – Click above for high-res image gallery

79

IIHS crash tests – Click above for high-res image gallery

109

IIHS crash tests – Click above for high-res image gallery

32

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has commissioned a study that seems to indicate that a dramatic increase in roof safety is in order. The group's resulting newly proposed standards would require a vehicle's roof to withstand two-times the specific vehicle's weight. According to the IIHS, this change could reduce the risk of fatalities in a single vehicle rollover by more than 20%.

30

Click above for a gallery of high-res IIHS crash carnage

14

There is a lot of stuff that needs to be considered when purchasing a car for its economy. Obviously, being AutoblogGreen and all, we are concerned with fuel efficiency. Still, a car's mileage or how green it actually may be aren't the only things to consider when it comes to choosing your next vehicle. For instance, when a car is involved in a low-speed accident, how much damage does it sustain? Why does this matter? Besides the obvious dollar amount you would have to spend on getting your car

21

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety took some GMC Acadias and smashed them up to see how the big crossovers hold up against immovable objects, and unlike recent tests conducted for the Chevy Equinox and Pontiac Torrent, the news is positive. An AWD Acadia SLE acted as a stand-in for all of the Lambda models - Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Traverse, Saturn Outlook, and all Acadia trims included. It didn't matter whether the IIHS attacked the front, side, or rear – the CUV earned a "good"

10

One of the biggest questions to consider with tiny cars like the Smart ForTwo is what happens in a crash? The Smart is only eight and a half feet long. The first generation Smart has been tested numerous times over the years and always done reasonably well especially in comparison to other really small and even some considerably larger cars. When the feds tested it recently for the official test it did fairly well with scores of 4 and 3 stars for driver and passenger frontal protection. There wa

17

Crash safety ratings are a big selling point – who's going to buy a car with just two stars? In pursuit of salable collision performance, automakers have turned to stronger metals and better construction, and consumers can reap the benefit by choosing from a panoply of highly rated vehicles. A problem arises, however, if that safety design is ever called upon to perform. Lots of vehicles now sport high strength steel in critical areas like roof pillars, and while it certainly helps protect

1 / 1