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81967 Maserati Ghibli puts the grand in grand tourer

Motor Tend technical director Frank Markus owns a 1967 Maserati Ghibli, bought back in the early 2000s when "they could be had for Camry money" – now Hagerty values them anywhere from $63,000 to $107,000. The grand tourer designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro outsold the more powerful and less expensive Ferrari 365 Daytona, and the more powerful and more expensive Lamborghini Miura.

8GM Hit With New Lawsuit Over Ignition Switch Deaths

Plaintiffs may not meet certain requirements that would entitle them to damages via a compensation fund

A lawsuit filed in a New York court Tuesday seeks damages on behalf of more than 650 people allegedly injured or killed in General Motors' defective cars.

1Former NHTSA Chief Rebukes General Motors

Safety agency has 107 detailed questions for Detroit-based automaker

A former head of the federal agency that regulates vehicle safety admonished General Motors on Thursday for delaying a recall of more than 1.3 million vehicles that had a deadly defect for years.

95GM knew about fatal Chevy ignition problem decade before recall

Well, this is not good for General Motors. Following a report last week that GM was recalling 778,000 Chevrolet Cobalt and Pontiac G5 compacts over concerns that the ignition could switch out of the "run" position without warning, USA Today reports that the Detroit-based behemoth knew about the issue, which affected 2005 to 2007 Cobalts (the Cobalt shown above and in the gallery is from 2010) and 2007 Pontiac G5s, all the way back in 2004.

370Motor Trend suggests Tesla Model S may be most important new car since Ford Model T

"It may very well be the most important new car since the Model T."

AddHacking keyless entry and ignition systems is easier than you think

Anything that emits a signal can be intercepted. Or extended. So with that simple fact in mind, researchers at ETH Zurich in Switzerland were able to imitate the signal coming from a car's key fob, allowing them to open the doors and drive away. And it wasn't just one model from one brand. The study included 10 different models from eight manufacturers.

4VIDEO: So that's what it looks like! -- Slo-Mo combustion closeup

We all learn the theory of what happens inside an internal combustion engine; a mixture of fuel and air is ignited by a short electric spark. Some people describe the ensuing event as an explosion, but the ideal is a controlled burn, but it's still so fast that it could be confused for an uncontrolled explosion. An engine is a practical application of thermodynamics, when it comes right down to it. The piston moves by the pressure exerted by the burning fuel mixture, and as the piston moves down

13Anyone seen my keys? Check with Nissan

At least they're not mocking men or making light of depressed robots. Nissan's latest marketing effort for the Altima has the auto company messing with patrons of entertainment venues. 200,000 sets of faux keys will be planted in clubs, bars, concert venues, and other congregation locations. The way the ruse works is that someone picks up the keys, and takes in a tidy little marketing message about the Altima's keyless ignition as they read the keychain. It's a great example of thinking outside

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