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13Google shacking up with Continental on self-driving cars

Google, well known tester of self-driving cars, may have just come one step closer to making its sci-fi tech a widely realistic proposition. Along with IBM, it's inked a deal with tier one supplier Continental, according to Reuters. The official announcement is set to be made during September's Frankfurt Motor Show.

AddMiddle Tennessee State working on $3,000 after-market plug-in hybrid kit

A plug-in hybrid kit that even a starving college student may be able to afford?

AddIBM names Coda a 'GOOD' company

Well, it can't be a bad thing to be mentioned in the same breath as the Green Bay Packers, though last year would've been better timing.

AddNew partners join IBM's lithium air project to develop 500-mile battery

Work is continuing on IBM's wish-we-had-it-now lithium-air battery technology. Today, IBM is announcing that two new partners – Asahi Kasei and Central Glass – are joining the Battery 500 Project team. The idea, as the number suggests, is to develop a battery for passenger cars that can provide enough energy to go 500 miles. The secret? Energy pulled from thin air.

AddIBM developing air battery with 500-mile range

One nagging issue with electric vehicles is range. While today's lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are much better than yesterday's nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries, they still don't offer enough energy storage to take an EV much further than 100 miles without a lengthy recharge. Even if the Li-ion batteries were up to the challenge, there is still the awkward problem of where to pack 1,000 pounds (or more) of bulky storage cells into a vehicle's chassis.

86IBM developing air battery with 500-mile range

One nagging issue with electric vehicles is range. While today's lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are much better than yesterday's nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries, they still don't offer enough energy storage to take an EV much further than 100 miles without a lengthy recharge. Even if the Li-ion batteries were up to the challenge, there is still the awkward problem of where to pack 1,000 pounds (or more) of bulky storage cells into a vehicle's chassis.

AddHow much does software add to the cost of today's vehicles? How about tomorrow's electric cars?

Hughes Telematics Connected Car – Click above for high-res image

AddIBM wants to control your car at stoplights - 1984, here we come

No one is saying start-stop technology like the kind found in electric and hybrid vehicles isn't a great idea. We just told you about how BMW's 320d EfficientDynamics model is able to squeeze over 1000 miles out of a tank of diesel in part due to start-stop tech, for example. It's awesome, no doubt.

AddIBM gets 24M hours of supercomputing time to work on lithium air batteries

The United States Department of Energy has granted IBM 24 million hours of computing time on the supercomputers at the Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The reason? Research on lithium air batteries. Lithium air batteries hold a lot of potential for dramatically increasing energy density for electric vehicles, potentially up to 5,000 watt-hours per kilogram.

AddREPORT: IBM working to develop 500-mile lithium-air battery pack

Last week, a consortium of some of the nation's leading scientists and engineers reportedly met in California to develop a new battery pack for electric cars. Sponsored by IBM and its Big Green Innovations program, the so-called Battery 500 team hopes to create a power pack capable of propelling a vehicle for up to 500 miles.

AddA video game to find oil and gas... sounds like a potential best-seller!

Video games have been a popular topic this week on AutoblogGreen. Just a few days ago, we shared news about racing a Tesla Roadster against a Ferrari in the upcoming game Project Gotham Racing 4. While that sounds way cooler than digging around looking for oil, the same computers could be used for developing both, according to this story from the University of Houston (UH). The computer in question is a supercomputer from IBM which uses processor technology called the Cell Broadband Engine&trade

AddIBM and OESA to hold automotive industry brainstorming jam

IBM has been running brainstorming 'jams' for years now, I remember them myself from my days with Big Blue. Until now though, the ecosystem of automotive suppliers has yet to take advantage of these online brainstorming session where thousands of people from hundreds of organisations come together, via online discussion, to identify solutions to common industry challenges and concerns. IBM is teaming up with the Original Equipment Suppliers Association (OESA) to hold the first ever Automotive Su

17You're angry with me, aren't you Dave?

It's so cool when science fiction becomes science fact. Unless it goes horribly wrong. Think Arthur C. Clarke's HAL 9000 in the Space Odyssey series. At this week's Convergence 2006 Transportation Electronic Conference in Detroit, engineers, technologists and executives are discussing ways to integrate the latest advances in computer technology with your automobile, while hopefully making them less sociopathic. One particular discussion has focused on voice recognition and the way the car respon

AddWhat does your employer do for your commute? US government ranks top 20 workplaces for commuters

For the last three years, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transporation have ranked 20 companies that they feel offer the best benefits for commuters and for three years Intel has come out on top. Why shouldn't they? They offer their employees vanpools, subsidies for public transportation, showers and storage for those who bike or run and even a dry-cleaner to lessen the demand for driving. And what if you could measure your commute times in milliseconds? In 2005, a who

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