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But what is it, everyone wants to know.

Let the speculations begin.

Study shows a cycle of excitement, failure and disappointment.

Failure to meet unrealistic goals has us looking for the next great green solution.

Coda sedan - Click above for high-res image gallery

Following EEStor's permittivity announcement on Earth Day last week, I wrote a post that ended with a call for our readers to determine if the stated "relative permittivity of 22,500" was a big deal or not. There were some educated responses (thank you), but one refrain that kept appearing was that everyone is waiting for a real and physical demonstration of the company's supposedly amazing ultracapacitor. "Until then," some of you wrote, "stfu EEStor."

Remember the WIRED article exposing the, let's say, odd things that have happened at electric car company Zap? EDN's technical editor, Paul Rako, has written an article saying that EV hucksterism needs to be everybody's business. Basically, he writes, don't buy the hype. "When unknown hucksters start peddling their BS it is time to take a deep breath and hope sanity prevails," he said. Rako singles out John Goodwin, who's creating Neil Young's LincVolt, as the best example of EV hucksterism. Rea

In typical fashion, Zap has responded to the critical exposé that was published Wired recently with, you guessed it, more press releases. The releases, of course, do nothing at all to address any of the issues raised in the article about the company's business practices. Zap has heavily promoted several amazing new vehicles, none of which have been delivered even in prototype form. One of the press releases does point to an article in Popular Mechanics titled "5 Electric Cars Making Histo

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