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54

FCEV Now Arriving In March 2016

Instead of hosting the world debut of the production version of its hydrogen fuel cell sedan at the LA Auto Show this coming week, Honda decided to debut the vehicle in Japan today. And, it's not the production version that was shown off, it was an evolved concept. And, instead of coming in 2015, as previously stated, the car is now scheduled to drop in March 2016 in Japan, followed by releases in Europe and the US.

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Japanese Automaker Confirms H2 Vehicle Name, Means 'Future'

Looks like someone was able to read the future back in July. That's when rumors first circulated that Toyota's upcoming fuel cell vehicle will be called the Mirai. Today, Toyota president Akio Toyoda confirmed the name alongside plans to build out a hydrogen refueling infrastructure in the US Northeast.

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Electrolyzers, Natural Gas And Grid Balancing Are The Keys

There's a problem that need solving when it comes to renewable energy. Where do you put it when it's not needed? Graham Cooley, CEO of ITM Power, has what he says is the best answer: you turn it into hydrogen.

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Pat Cox Explains Europe's Current Hydrogen Infrastructure Situation

Pat Cox does not work for Toyota and we don't think he has any secret inside information. Still, he's the former President of the European Parliament and the current high level coordinator for TransEuropean Network, so when he says Toyota is likely going to lose between 50,000 and 100,000 euros ($66,000 and $133,000) on each of the hydrogen-powered FCV sedans it will sell next year, it's worth noting.

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There's a lot of information on display at the 2014 Michelin Challenge Bibendum. We've spent time this week trying to sponge it all in but one of the charts caught out eye today. In a session on hydrogen vehicles – about which we'll have more later – a representative from Air Liquide, Jean-Baptiste Mossa, shared a chart about how hydrogen vehicles fall in a sweet spot for vehicle emissions and range. Maybe you can notice the number that stood out.

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Honda is going to launch a hydrogen-powered production vehicle (its second, really) next year, but the all-important H2 infrastructure question hasn't been fully answered yet. One possible solution is being tested over in the United Kingdom, where Honda is turning solar energy and water into hydrogen at its Swindon plant. SHD Logistics says the plant is the UK's "first commercial-scale hydrogen production and refuelling facility powered by solar energy."

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It's been two decades since Toyota dominated the World Rally Championship with its Celica Turbo 4WD. But this past weekend, Toyota hit the rally stage in a very different vehicle.

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Say What?

It's no secret that Toyota doesn't really have a heart in pushing pure electric vehicles. The very limited Scion iQ EV project was killed before it went very far and the RAV4 EV project with Tesla was always only meant to produce just 2,600 units, but it didn't even get that far. In short, by all public appearances, Toyota just doesn't see the value of a pure EV.

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New Keyword Is 'Appropriate'

If only all of us were told that we could meet our goals and obligations by merely being "appropriate." That's the operative word being used to describe the European Union's goals for setting up publicly accessible electric-vehicle charging station and hydrogen refueling station infrastructure by the end of the decade. Turns out, the goals were unrealistic.

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Are You A Handbrake Or A Trailblazer?

Toyota's confidence in H2 technology remains as strong as ever. The company has released a new commercial that says it's not a matter of if we all start driving hydrogen cars, but when. In fact, the 70-second spot calls 2015 the turning point for the alternative powertrain technology.

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Fuel-cell bicycles. It's an idea that comes around every couple of years. Or about seven. It's a complicated process, but then again, so is procuring a little hydrogen.

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Maybe we should just admit that the future is unpredictable, especially the hydrogen economy. Just recently, we've seen Toyota predict the cost of hydrogen will be between $5-and-$7 per kilogram in the future. UC Davis also recently released a report that says hydrogen can be inexpensive in the future, but that likely continued fracking for natural gas will be necessary. But what if it isn't?

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UC Davis Finds Prospects For H2 Are Good, But There's A Catch

*UPDATE: As our commentors have pointed out, it costs less than 10 cents a mile to drive an EV today. We apologize for the error.

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At a cost of up to $2 million to install a station and barely any hydrogen vehicles on the roads, it might seem like the payback time on a hydrogen refueling setup would be quite long. However, First Element Fuel (FEF) thinks that it will only take five years to make a profit selling H2 to paying customers.

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And Free Fuel, Too, Why Not?

There's no such thing as a free lunch. A free hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle, though? It may become a possibility in Japan, says Automotive News.

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If California is going to sink millions upon millions to expand its hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, shouldn't at least some of that infrastructure be operated by a company that actually produces hydrogen fuel? Why, yes, and that's the case with Linde North America. The company has announced it will build two publicly-accessible hydrogen stations in Northern California, courtesy of a $4.3 million grant from the California Energy Commission (CEC).

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Hydrogen Is The Fuel Of The Future, And Always Will Be!

Last year Elon Musk came straight out and said fuel cells are so bullsh*t. A couple months ago Slashdot ran an article asking where the future of automobiles was going: Fuel Cell or Battery Electric Vehicles. Mercedes, BMW, Mitsubishi, Renault / Nissan and of course Tesla are fully invested in battery powered electric vehicles, and yet somehow hydrogen fuel cells continue to be brought up as a viable alternative.

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Japan's prime minister has a lead foot, apparently. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe recently had a photo op with Toyota's first production hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, even getting behind the wheel for a spin (no chauffeur for him, so much respect on our part). His primary impression was that the car had great pickup, before settling on the more politically correct view of noting the vehicle's lack of emissions.

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Imagine if a little bit of water could make your internal combustion engine run cleaner and more efficiently, and help it produce more oxygen than a tree. That's what the LeefH2 device is designed to help your motor do. HNO Green Fuels, the maker of the LeefH2, wants to turn your engine – and every other combustion engine – into an oxygen farm while reducing particulate matter and getting more power out of your fuel.

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Anybody remember the Ford Futura? It wasn't exactly a world-beater of a car, so we don't think the name Toyota's has apparently chosen for its first production fuel-cell vehicle is a tribute of sorts. Though one never knows. Maybe Toyota just likes 18-inch-tall EVs.

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