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Clever. The air hybrid powertrain that Citroen will be bringing to the Geneva Motor Show next month is nicknamed N-Air-Gy. Or, at least, that's what it says in the rendering that Citroen released today in preparation for the Swiss event. We've heard about this technology before, with the hint that it might some day go into one of PSA Citroen's B-segment compact hatchbacks. In Geneva, the powertrain will be displayed in a C3 VTi 82 hatchback.


Nike single-handedly popularized the term "swoosh." If a new and unexpected project works out as planned, PSA Peugeot Citroen might do the same with "whoosh."


Chrysler Group CEO Sergio Marchionne and Lisa Jackson, Agency Administrator for the EPA, announced a new research project to bring hydraulic hybrid technology to the marketplace. The new hybrid will be based on Chrysler's Town & Country minivan, although this shouldn't be confused with the other minivan hybrid Chrysler is working on for 2013.


The closest Americans can get to a hybrid minivan in 2011 – an entirely practical vehicle if there ever was one – are the Prius V and the 2012 Ford C-Max, both of which are due later this year but are not really minivans. This will sort of change in 2012 thanks to a new research project announced today by Chrysler Group CEO Sergio Marchionne and Lisa Jackson, Agency Administrator for the EPA.


Sheik, hydro and roll – Click above to watch video after the jump


Click above for more shots of the hydrostatic chopper


It's not often that a Hummer is pictured here on AutoblogGreen but this particular brute, owned by hydraulic hose and belt supplier Gates, is being converted to a hydraulic hybrid using a system developed by Hybra-Drive. We introduced them to you in '07 and now that they're making some news, we wanted to bring them back. Their set-up, you'll remember, uses a conventional engine to pressurize a hydraulic system to send power to the wheels which is said by the company to reduce fuel consumption by


Many modern vehicles already use hydraulic power for certain functions, namely power steering and brakes. Companies such as UPS, though, see potential in using hydraulic systems as part of a hybrid drivetrain. While nobody is expecting a hybrid hydraulic system to be able to store enough energy to achieve miles-upon-miles of driving distance, the frequent stopping and restarting of some vehicles - delivery trucks, to name just one obvious example - make them excellent candidates for possible hy


Big serious trucks are not usually what comes to mind when you think of the word "hybrid" but in a world of $100+ barrels of light sweet crude, Peterbilt is putting out some products that may change that. Its medium duty Model 330 (photo above) is just like a Prius. Except it takes diesel and boasts as much torque as a herd of Prii.


Hydraulic hybrids have been on the drawing boards for a few years now, with company's such as FedEx and UPS testing systems as we speak. Even Ford has dabbled in hydraulic technology for their line of mainstream F-Series trucks. One benefit to using hydraulics as opposed to electric hybrids is that more energy can potentially be recaptured when braking, which is then re-used to start the vehicle moving forward again. This idea is put to good use in this concept as well, which was created in just


"This new powertrain is more efficient than electric hybrid powertrains being used in such cars as Toyota Prius and Ford Escape" says James O'Brien owner of Hybra-Drive Systems. What is Hybra-drive? It's a regenerative braking system that uses pressurized fluid to store the braking energy. "We are not aware of anything else like it" says O'Brien. The Hybra-drive website says it "improves fuel economy by upwards of 60% and reduces emissions by upwards of 90% while maintaining a platform that cost


One of the areas where tremendous fuel savings can be achieved is in delivery trucks. The stop and go driving many of these trucks are put through each day is a perfect fit for a hybrid vehicle. So why have we not seen much about hybrid technologies for heavy vehicles, such as delivery trucks? Many the heavy vehicles, such as highway trucks, delivery vans and buses use diesel engines. These diesel engines are already very efficient, so technology alternatives to improve fuel economy are not read

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