10 Articles
1 / 1

ACLU Says Federal Plan Creates Privacy Risks

A Homeland Security plan to use a national database of license-plate reader data for investigative purposes is drawing criticism from the American Civil Liberties Union, which says the proposal doesn't do enough to protect the privacy of law-abiding Americans.


Program Amounts To Warrantless Surveillance On Law-Abiding Americans, Critics Say

A little more than a year after the Department of Homeland Security canceled a plan to build a national license-plate reader database amid an outcry over privacy intrusions, federal officials are renewing the push.


The federal government's plan to build a nationwide database of information culled from license-plate scanners has been canceled. Officials from the Department of Homeland Security quickly reversed course on the proposed project late Wednesday, saying top officials within the department and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency were unaware of it.


Privacy advocates worry about such detailed data collection

The Department of Homeland Security wants to build a massive database of information collected from license-plate scanners across the country.


Long lines, short tempers, small staffs and big demand make for a hellish experience at the DMV. The great, wide state of Tennessee is looking to technology for relief. Around the state, at 26 DMV offices, the state's Department of Homeland Security has deployed 76 Apple iPads for drivers renewing their licenses.


Because we the enthusiast people didn't gather behind the effort to lower the gray market importation limit from 25 to 15 years, the We The People petition filed a couple of months ago has failed. In order to get the Executive Branch to consider such requests, each petition needs 25,000 signatures and this one didn't get it. That isn't to say the decision would have been overturned, but now it won't even get a look.


A group of enthusiasts have started a We The People petition urging the Executive Branch in Washington to stop using what it says are Homeland Security funds to police gray-market vehicles. The petition also seeks to have the federal gray market exemption age reduced from 25 years old to 15 years old. As of right now, any vehicle imported into the U.S. must be able to comply with our government's safety and emissions standards unless they are 25 years old or older, making it nearly impossible fo


In 1974, this 1965 Volkswagen Type 2 (a.k.a. 'Bus') was stolen from Washington State. Fast-forward to October 19 of this year and custom agents at the Port of Los Angeles open up a container bound for Europe only to rediscover said van. Somehow, the Bus's VIN was still in the LAPD's stolen vehicle database. Guess which 1965 Type 2 is no longer headed for Europe?


2010 Ford F150 SVT Raptor - Click above image for high-res gallery


You don't want to commit a crime in the city of Germantown, Tennessee. Ever. Otherwise, you could find yourself facing the ultimate in armored personnel carriers.

1 / 1
Share This Post