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Companies Will Accept Liability For Their Self-Driving Cars

Self-driving cars could make our commutes a breeze but what happens when something goes wrong? Three industry leaders step up with an answer. Autoblog's Adam Morath reports on this edition of Autoblog Minute, with commentary from Pete Bigelow.


Volvo Chief Explains Company's New Path

There's a lot happening at Volvo right now. To get an idea of what's ahead for the Swedish automaker, we sit down with the company's chief, Hakan Samuelsson, to get a glimpse into the future of Volvo.


Struggling Volvo may be on a verge of a renaissance thanks to the forthcoming completion of its lauded concept car trilogy, new Drive-E engine family and much-discussed SPA modular platform. Its nascent renewal is mostly being financed by $11-billion in funding from its Chinese parent company, Geely, and if it all goes right, Volvo hopes to sell 100,000 cars a year in the States by 2016. That milestone is vital, because it would ensure Volvo's US dealer network is profitable, according to Volvo


After a little more than three years since Volvo was acquired by China's Geely, it was only a matter of time before products from this marriage started to show up in the US. Although nothing seems to be written in stone, Automotive News is reporting that the US could be getting Chinese-made Volvos sooner rather than later.


Ford sold Volvo to Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Limited in 2010. Just two years later, Geely announced an $11-billion investment in the Swedish carmaker, its charismatic fugleman Li Shifu saying, "We want to revive Volvo and give the brand its strength back." Two years later, after having introduced the Concept XC Coupe at the Detroit Auto Show this week, Volvo CEO Håkan Samuelsson (above, second from right) declared the company profitable again after a solid 2013 and predicted a positive


Volvo has already announced the end of production for its C70 hardtop convertible, a handsome but seriously dated offering that was last refreshed in 2010. Volvo won't be abandoning the two-door coupe-convertible market for long, though, as news out of Australia claims that a replacement, based on the striking Concept Coupe, will join the Chinese-owned, Swedish brand's ranks, although it's unclear precisely when we'll see it on the road.


Volvo CEO Hakan Samuelsson will be making a rather large charitable donation - 500,000 Euros ($668,000), according to Bloomberg. This is not, however, a move out of the goodness of his heart. It's part of an agreement the exec made after a court case in Germany. Samuelsson spent nine years at truck manufacturer MAN, with his last four years as the boss. During his tenure, though, MAN was accused of illegal conduct, now understood to be bribes, in its Slovenian operations.

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