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Former defense department official: stricter safeguards needed

Traffic lights and traffic-management systems might prove attractive targets for cyber attacks in coming years, a former defense department official warns.

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Critics say new measures don't go far enough in securing information

In a letter to the Federal Trade Commission, the 12 manufacturers that are members of the Auto Alliance committed to upholding principles that would provide more transparent notices to consumers about what data is being collected, minimize the amount and time of data that is stored and prohibit this information from being given to law enforcement without a court order.

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Zubie, An Aftermarket Device, Left Vehicle Vulnerable

Former members of an Israeli intelligence unit dedicated to thwarting cyber crimes announced Friday they had remotely hacked into a vehicle that contained an aftermarket device with a big security hole.

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General Motors made a splash earlier this month when it announced it would add wireless hotspots to many vehicles in its 2015 lineup and introduce more advanced technology going forward.

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New research suggests features like collision prevention make vehicles more susceptible

Features in many new cars that are widely seen as the first steps toward a self-driving future may also making cars more susceptible to cyber crime, according to a recent study.

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"You can have everything super-secure, but one part can compromise everything in the car, including safety." – Walter Buga

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Apparently, Tesla Motors is abiding by the wise words of Chinese military general Sun Tzu to keep its friends close and its enemies closer. The tech-heavy electric vehicle maker attended the recent Def Con conference in Las Vegas, The Wall Street Journal reports, in order to learn about computer-security advances and to attract hackers. Come and get it.

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New cars with complex networks easiest to hack

When buying a car, consumers look for crash ratings and the amount of airbags, but they're missing information about one critical key safety feature; the security of the car's computer network.

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A car is no longer a car. It's a computer with wheels and an engine.

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Cars can be as easily hacked as a computer

Today's new cars come equipped with dozens of microcomputers connected by a network and run everything from infotainment systems to the engine itself. Like any other computer system, the units inside our cars are vulnerable. Hackers can infiltrate these systems. Once they're inside, they can do anything from steal your data to control your car.

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The $10,000 prize for successfully hacking a Tesla Model S has been claimed. A team from Zhejiang University in China claimed victory at the Symposium on Security for Asia Network (SyScan360) event in Beijing by exploiting a "flow design flaw," whatever that means, to gain access to vital systems including the door locks, horn and window controls, while the vehicle was moving.

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New research shows how easy it is to infiltrate key traffic-control systems

The next time Gov. Chris Christie wants to create traffic problems on the George Washington Bridge, he may have more sophisticated options than an old-fashioned study.

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His work on automotive cyber threats has one U.S. senator asking questions

Chris Valasek isn't your traditional gearhead. He doesn't care about the horsepower of his engine. He doesn't change his own oil. "I don't even get my oil changed," he confesses.

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If you own an Apple iPhone or Android device, perhaps you've been tempted to jailbreak or root it. This process gives you access to the the software's code, and can be used to make minor or drastic changes to its operating system. CarKnow, a company in Boston, is working applying a similar concept to the automobile.

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They're the first researchers to publish coding and details of automotive cyber experiment

Automotive hackers commandeered control of a Ford Escape and Toyota Prius during a recent experiment, and using data culled from the experiment came up with some tips on how automakers can block hackers from gaining access to cars.

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Volkswagen says British university explains how to hack into its vehicles

A British university is delaying the release of an academic paper on how the anti-theft systems of millions of Volkswagen vehicles are at risk of being hacked after the German carmaker took legal action against it.

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When meeting a duo of computer hackers for the very first time, we imagine hearing the words "We want to convince you that we can hurt you – without hurting you," is bound to release the hounds of anxiety upon your mental makeup. At least, it would ours. And it's those words, uttered by Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek to Forbes staff reporter Andy Greenberg, that introduce us to the reality that modern-day cars can indeed be hacked.

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According to Toyota, a former employee has hacked into its computer systems and stolen sensitive information.

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The group of hackers known as Anonymous issued a press release last night announcing their intent to hack and take down the official website for Formula One at formulaone.com for the duration of the Bahrain Grand Prix. Their reason? To protest the increasingly violent crackdown on the people of Bahrain by their own government.

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Most of us don't quite understand why we'd want Facebook in our cars, but during a recent Hackathon at Facebook's Palo Alto campus, the Blue Oval and the new Big Blue combined forces to go beyond status updates and photos sharing.

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A group of computer scientists managed to wirelessly hack into an unnamed sedan, insert a bit of malicious code and control the vehicle's ECU, giving them access to a variety of in-car control systems. This recent study is further proof that our constantly connected cars are becoming vulnerable to attacks, but sometimes the facts aren't as clear as they'd seem.

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