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That tailwind Toyota may be feeling in Japan won't be from a stiff breeze off the northern Pacific Ocean. The Japanese automaker is getting ready to start selling its first production hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle in its native country next year. And the government is ponying up real big in incentives, Reuters says.


Zero-emissions vehicle development has never focused purely on off-the-line acceleration. So when a research executive with Mercedes-Benz parent Daimler says it's Okay that companies like Toyota and Hyundai will have a head start selling hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle, it's somewhat believable. But is Daimler really fine with being two years behind? It appears so.


Toyota has finally unveiled its FCV hydrogen fuel cell sedan and its Japanese price. We won't have to wait too long to see the first of these revolutionary vehicles on the roads. It will go on sale in Japan in April 2015 and will come to the US and Europe later that summer.


There is death. There are taxes. And there is the US Department of Energy (DOE) periodically funding millions of dollars worth of grants towards advancing hydrogen fuel-cell technology. This time, the DOE says it will write checks for $20 million, and the goal is pretty specific: bringing the production and distribution costs of hydrogen to less than the equivalent of $4 a gallon.


H2 supporters say he's wrong, of course, but he fights back


This would really be news is if a publicly accessible hydrogen refueling station was opening outside of Southern California. But we'll have to wait a bit more for that. What we have here is Cal State Los Angeles announcing that a new hydrogen station is up and running as of Wednesday. And it's within spitting distance of a bunch of freeways, which is always a good thing.


We know that Toyota is gung-ho about delivering its first hydrogen fuel cell sedan to early-adopter markets like southern California and part of Japan next year. The Japanese automaker's European H2 plans have long been part of the mix, but a new press release shows just how committed Toyota is to hydrogen all around the world.


Things are running a little bit behind on Hyundai's hydrogen-powered Tucson Fuel Cell CUV program in the US. The last time we checked in with the South Korean automaker's H2 project, we heard that the first deliveries were supposed to happen by the end of March. Speaking with Hyundai's Kevin Lee at the Hyundai booth at the SAE World Congress this week, we learned that deliveries are now going to happen closer to a month from now.


It's an old question: how safe is hydrogen? With seemingly every singe fire connected to an electric vehicle making national headlines, it's no surprise that understanding the dangers of H2 in a transportation environment is an area of interest. A new report by ProPublica shows that there's more to hydrogen safety than one might initially suspect. 37 more, in fact.


Toyota's Bob Carter has been talking about green cars for years, but it's only been recently that his comments have really caught widespread attention thanks to his disparaging remarks about electric vehicle supporters like Elon Musk and Carlos Ghosn and optimism about hydrogen. Speaking at the opening of the Chicago Auto Show this morning, Carter said that Toyota has claimed the "pole position on CAFE," thanks to its deep hybrid bench. The company's green car cred will continue to grow because


A plug-in electric vehicle can be used to power a house during a winter storm, but if you're more worried about the heat of, say, Death Valley, then maybe you'll want a Mercedes-Benz B-Class F-Cell along. That's the message of a new video from Daimler and starring Diane Kruger (Inglourious Basterds) and Joshua Jackson (Fringe) that promotes the company's hydrogen-powered car. The gist? You can drink the tailpipe emissions.


Volkswagen has staked out a claim to be the industry leader in electric vehicles. One of the executives leading the VW Group into an e-mobililty future is Rudolf Krebs, who took over VW's electrification efforts back in 2010. Today, he is the group commissioner for electric drive systems for the VW Group, and he took part in a green energy round table at the LA Auto Show today. We'll have a more complete write-up on that discussion later, but for now we wanted to tease out something Krebs said a


The long-running joke is that, "hydrogen is the fuel of the future, and it always will be." But at the Los Angeles Auto Show and Tokyo Motor Show this week, Honda and Toyota are both showing off H2-powered concept vehicles that foreshadow production models coming around 2015. Toyota has the FCV Concept and Honda will reveal the FCEV Concept later today. In fact, the senior engineer for clean vehicles at the Union of Concerned Scientists, David Reichmuth, says FCEVs are "a vital part of the solut


Toyota has been teasing its upcoming hydrogen fuel cell sedan – due in 2015, maybe, see below – for years. The information we've heard is that the car will have a 300-mile range and cost between $50,000 and $100,000, but the one thing we haven't had is a glimpse of what it will look like. That changes now.


General Motors says one of its hydrogen fuel cell Chevrolet Equinox crossovers has driven enough miles to offset more than $18,000 worth of gasoline. Of course, fuel-cell vehicles cost quite a bit more than that to build and hydrogen fuel ain't free, but we'll go along with this. Specifically, GM is commemorating the fact that one of the fuel cell vehicles in its test fleet surpassed 100,000 miles, which the automaker estimates would've otherwise used 5,260 gallons of gas. At $3.50 a pop, that's


Any discussion of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is sure to lead to a discussion of where the hydrogen is going to come from. Even though Japanese car companies have been making public strides with hydrogen for years now, the situation is no different there.


Despite the fact that they are both zero-emission vehicle technologies that can be powered by renewable energy, there's no question that advocates of plug-in electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are sometimes at odds with each other. So, it's nice when we get a somewhat neutral analysis of the two technologies, and that's what a commentary written by Carlos Uribe, a Seeking Alpha Market Exclusive contributor, does, laying out why EVs will win, hands down.


OK, this time they're really doing it. Mercedes-Benz parent Daimler is leading a collaboration between a half-dozen companies - including Air Liquide, Linde, OMV, Shell and Total - that will rapidly expand Germany's publicly accessible hydrogen refueling network in order to better spur the hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle market.


As expected, the governor of California, Jerry Brown, has signed Assembly Bill 8 – the pro-electric-vehicle, pro-hydrogen-refueling-station bill – into law. That means the state of California will now spend over $2 billion to extend plug-in vehicle credits and on building a network of up to 100 H2 stations over the next decade, according to The Detroit News.


Last week, California regulators approved a bill that will fund more fleet purchases of zero-emissions vehicles while setting up a network of hydrogen refueling stations throughout the most populous US state.


The US Department of Energy (DOE) is continuing to show support for next-gen fuel cell systems. In June, DOE rolled out $9 million in grants to speed up the technology, and this month, an announcement was made that $4.5 will be invested in two projects focused on advanced fuel cell membranes. Minnesota based-3M will receive $3 million and the Colorado School of Mines will receive $1.5 million.

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