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29

Child right's advocate Marian Wright Edelman once said, "If you don't like the way the world is, you change it." We're guessing David Montenegro is a firm believer in that idea. You'll recall that Montenegro, better known by his legal name of Human, is the New Hampshire man who fought and won a case in the state's Supreme Court to obtain a vanity plate that read "COPSLIE." Now, Human has announced that he'll be making at the state's House of Representatives.

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The Japanese government is really paving the way for hydrogen fuel cell technology on its roads. Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry is changing regulations on fuel tanks to make hydrogen cars more appealing to drivers, which should help put the country ahead of others in the race to develop a viable H2 fleet.

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Any business reporter is taught that, when in doubt, always follow the money. With China's aggressive push for advanced-powertrain vehicle production and sales, that means better fleetwide fuel economy. Why? Lower fuel use means less money spent importing oil. It's that simple.

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Hedge fund managers have been suing Porsche for years now, alleging that the car company lied about its intentions during its failed attempt to take over Volkswagen, a gambit that caused them billion in losses. Over the same period, authorities in Stuttgart built a criminal case against former CEO Wendelin Wiedeking (above, left) and Chief Financial Officer Holger Härter (right), filing charges in December 2012. When those fund plaintiffs lost their most recent court case, one of the dimmin

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The US government really does have a plan for how advanced-drivetrain technology will help the country meet its goal of cutting petroleum imports in half by the end of the decade, which means US emissions will need to be 17 percent lower than they were in 2005. The plans involves, among other things, battery improvements, hydrogen fuel-cell technology, biofuels and more vehicle-electrification advancements. Not to mention lions, and tigers and bears. Oh my.

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The late-80s and early-90s saw the Canadian government divest itself from some of its largest state-owned businesses (known in Commonwealth countries as Crown Corporations) – particularly when it came to transport and energy companies. In a sweeping implementation of Thatcherism led by Conservative premier Brian Mulroney, Ottawa privatized aerospace companies Canadair and de Havilland in 1986, sold off Air Canada in 1988, liquidated its majority stake in Petro-Canada in 1991 and finished s

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The US will soon work with China as the world's most populous nation works to draft stricter emissions standards. The two countries certainly know how to put pollution into the air – China is the world's biggest emitter polluter, followed by the US.

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A San Diego woman who was ticketed in October by the California Highway Patrol for wearing Google Glass while driving pleaded not guilty and will fight the citation in court, Yahoo reports. The woman, Cecilia Abadie, was pulled over for driving 80 miles per hour in a 65-mph zone.

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Tesla's strategy to sell cars, such as the Model S, through manufacturer-owned retail stores has rubbed traditional franchise auto dealerships the wrong way. The battle between Tesla and the Ohio Auto Dealers Association heated up quickly over the past week because a proposed amendment to an Ohio road-maintenance worker safety bill (Senate Bill 137) threatened to ban Tesla stores in Ohio. The automaker asked for help from its supporters to fight the amendment, and on Tuesday all 12 members of th

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Back in April, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released voluntary guidelines covering the use of in-car infotainment and communications in the hopes that automakers would reconfigure their systems to make them safer. But on Tuesday, NHTSA administrator David Strickland said at a congressional hearing that the administration has the authority to set vehicle smartphone guidelines and will release new voluntary guidelines next year, casting a wider net than the ones released in A

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Seat belts and alcohol test would be required to start car

The government is speeding up research on safety systems that automatically prevent drivers from operating their cars if they are drunk or aren't properly buckled in.

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When we last checked the status of the federal government's stake in General Motors in September, it owned about 7.3 percent - roughly 101-million shares worth about $3.7 billion - of the automaker. In October, the Fed sold almost a third of its remaining stake, or 29- to 30-million shares valued at about $1.2 billion, The Detroit News reports. Currently the government owns around 71-million shares.

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The number of vehicle deaths in the US has fallen since the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) was created in 1966, even as the number of drivers on the road has greatly increased and the number of miles they drive has increased exponentially more. But a Senate panel is debating whether NHTSA is moving fast enough to curb vehicle deaths, The Detroit News reports.

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According to a Brookings evaluation of the Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS), more commonly known as Cash for Clunkers, the $2.85-billion program cost taxpayers $1.4 million for each of the 3,676 jobs created by it from June to December 2009. The White House reportedly estimated that the program would create 70,000 jobs. Additionally, the evaluation states that more effective alternative fiscal stimulus policies could have been implemented instead of CARS.

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The government shutdown is eroding consumer confidence in the auto market, says John Krafcik, CEO of Hyundai's US sales unit, and could lower October sales by as much as 10 percent, Automotive News reports. "It's that anxiety that keeps customers, potential buyers, on the sidelines when making a big purchase like an automobile," Krafcik says, adding that industry sales could be off by five to 10 percent in October compared to September.

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The US government's shutdown may have an adverse effect on vehicle recalls and safety testing, according to a report from AOL Autos. Complaints can still be submitted to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, but nothing will actually be done about any of these submissions or any ongoing investigations until the agency's funding returns, NHTSA said in a statement.

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Since the US government shut down early this morning, more than 800,000 federal employees could be furloughed without pay until a deal is reached to start the government back up. To help affected employees cope with the temporary layoffs, Hyundai is expanding its Assurance program to defer all of their auto loan or lease payments until they're called back to work.

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In Saudi Arabia, where only men can earn a driver's license, a conservative cleric is drawing criticism for saying that women risk damaging their ovaries and bearing children with clinical problems if they drive, The Guardian reports.

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Ford is in a bit of a pickle for importing and selling Turkey-built Transit Connect cargo vans as passenger vehicles in the US, then converting them to commercial-vehicle specification stateside in an effort to bypass a 25-percent tax imposed on vehicles imported for commercial use. Automakers are required to pay a 2.5-percent tax on imported passenger vehicles.

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When it comes to electric-vehicle subsidies in the UK, the government is selling but the public isn't buying. British ministers are saying that a two-year-old program that funds 5,000 British pounds ($7,850) worth of subsidies to buyers of electric vehicles such as the Nissan Leaf will be shrunken and eventually phased out after demand turned out to be quite a bit less than expected, UK's Daily Mail reports.

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California could have become the fifth state to issue enhanced driver's licenses (EDL) and identification cards embedded with radio frequency identification (RFID) chips, but last Friday, state lawmakers suspended the legislation over privacy concerns. The RFID-equipped cards were to be optional, but ultimately it was a lack of measures to prevent law enforcement from tapping into the chips that killed the bill, WIRED reports.

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