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18Iowa working on smartphone driver's licenses

The digital tar pit will eventually consume us all, but for now, we're still able to watch it swallow our analog lives. One of the next items to succumb could be your driver's license, at least as soon as Iowa straightens out the kinks. The Hawkeye State is working with MorphoTrust USA on an driver's license app for Android and iOS phones that can be used as a state-approved ID. Notably, the app wouldn't replace a laminated paper version, but either could be used to conduct business. Iowa is alr

1GM's embattled top lawyer Millikin to retire

General Motors' top lawyer, Michael Millikin, will retire in early 2015, the Detroit automaker announced Friday.

103Billions of dollars at stake as dealers, Feds face off over auto loan regulations

NADA Argues For Status Quo; Government Wants Tighter Rules

"Dealers have to discount those rates to be competitive. The current system saves customers money. Period." – Forrest McConnell

24Hyundai hearts House Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Caucus in Tucson promotion

Hyundai may be based in South Korea, but the automaker is touting hydrogen fuel-cell technology as an all-American benefit and is getting some help from the US government to do so. The company said this week that it's collaborating with the US Department of Energy and the House Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Caucus at promoting fuel-cell technology. The timing is good because Hyundai just started selling the first mass-produced fuel-cell vehicle sold/leased in the US (unless you count the Honda FCX Clar

22Auto parts price-fixing is everywhere, crackdown threatens business model

China's recently instigated push to go after price fixing and monopolistic practices in the automotive sector has garnered a lot of ink, but regulatory bodies around the world have been tackling the issue for years. Lithium-ion battery makers were targeted in 2012, the US Department of Justice hit a cabal of Japanese suppliers for $740M in 2013 and Toyo Tires after that, the EU went after exhaust parts makers earlier this year. Nor are the investigations confined to the auto industry: aluminum p

7Lexus parts prices cut in China amidst antitrust fears

It's been a topsy-turvy summer for foreign businesses in China ever since that country's National Development and Reform Commission and State Administration for Industry & Commerce launched a horde of investigations into anti-monopoly practices. When the law outlining monopolistic behavior was passed in 2008 foreign companies appreciated it, expecting it to illuminate some of the more opaque corners of Chinese government enforcement. That hasn't exactly been the case, and now as more than 1,

32US government moves to mandate car connectivity [w/video]

The federal government is inching closer to mandating cars have the ability to communicate with each other, in a move regulators say could reduce crashes while still protecting motorists' personal information.

97Japan considering offering free hydrogen cars because $30k incentives apparently not enough

And Free Fuel, Too, Why Not?

There's no such thing as a free lunch. A free hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle, though? It may become a possibility in Japan, says Automotive News.

46Cellphone bans don't reduce accidents, research finds

"It was pretty clear to us that there was no compelling evidence of a decrease in accidents" – Daniel Kaffine

12China decrees 30 percent of new government vehicles will plug in

Maybe Warren Buffett's bet on Chinese electric-vehicle maker BYD will pay off after all. That's because the Chinese government just made a commitment to buy lots of advanced-powertrain vehicles through its government-vehicle system in an effort to address the notorious pollution problem in China's largest cities, the Associated Press says, citing China's Xinhua News Agency.

108Bay Area Governments Make Big Electric-Vehicle Buy

Six cities, two counties and two water agencies have united to buy 90 electric vehicles

A group of San Francisco Bay Area cities, counties and water agencies has joined forces for what is being billed as one of the largest single government purchases of all-electric vehicles in the country.

9Pennsylvania, Tesla approach five-store compromise [UPDATE]

In the Keystone State, the compromise number between zero and unlimited is five, apparently. Pennsylvania's Senate applied that math in an attempt to resolve the issue of allowing Tesla Motors to operate company-owned stores in the state. The senate this week unanimously voted for a bill that will allow Tesla's operations, but placed a limit on the number of stores at five. The bill will now go to the state's House for approval, according to Automotive News.

253What's this, a bipartisan proposal to increase the US gas tax?

Senators Corker (R) And Murphy (D) Want To Tie It To Inflation

It would be the first federal hike in gas taxes since 1993.

29Plaintiff in COPSLIE vanity plate suit now running for state representative

Child right's advocate Marian Wright Edelman once said, "If you don't like the way the world is, you change it." We're guessing David Montenegro is a firm believer in that idea. You'll recall that Montenegro, better known by his legal name of Human, is the New Hampshire man who fought and won a case in the state's Supreme Court to obtain a vanity plate that read "COPSLIE." Now, Human has announced that he'll be making at the state's House of Representatives.

58Japan's government gives hydrogen vehicles a big boost

The Japanese government is really paving the way for hydrogen fuel cell technology on its roads. Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry is changing regulations on fuel tanks to make hydrogen cars more appealing to drivers, which should help put the country ahead of others in the race to develop a viable H2 fleet.

27China's push for better fuel economy has a bigger purpose

Any business reporter is taught that, when in doubt, always follow the money. With China's aggressive push for advanced-powertrain vehicle production and sales, that means better fleetwide fuel economy. Why? Lower fuel use means less money spent importing oil. It's that simple.

4Former Porsche boss Wiedeking won't face criminal charges over VW bid

Hedge fund managers have been suing Porsche for years now, alleging that the car company lied about its intentions during its failed attempt to take over Volkswagen, a gambit that caused them billion in losses. Over the same period, authorities in Stuttgart built a criminal case against former CEO Wendelin Wiedeking (above, left) and Chief Financial Officer Holger Härter (right), filing charges in December 2012. When those fund plaintiffs lost their most recent court case, one of the dimmin

12DOE lays out 'all of the above' energy strategy for next five years

The US government really does have a plan for how advanced-drivetrain technology will help the country meet its goal of cutting petroleum imports in half by the end of the decade, which means US emissions will need to be 17 percent lower than they were in 2005. The plans involves, among other things, battery improvements, hydrogen fuel-cell technology, biofuels and more vehicle-electrification advancements. Not to mention lions, and tigers and bears. Oh my.

18Ontario looks to liquidate its holdings in General Motors

The late-80s and early-90s saw the Canadian government divest itself from some of its largest state-owned businesses (known in Commonwealth countries as Crown Corporations) – particularly when it came to transport and energy companies. In a sweeping implementation of Thatcherism led by Conservative premier Brian Mulroney, Ottawa privatized aerospace companies Canadair and de Havilland in 1986, sold off Air Canada in 1988, liquidated its majority stake in Petro-Canada in 1991 and finished s

56US to help China draft stricter emissions regulations

The US will soon work with China as the world's most populous nation works to draft stricter emissions standards. The two countries certainly know how to put pollution into the air – China is the world's biggest emitter polluter, followed by the US.

55Woman ticketed for driving with Google Glass to fight charge

A San Diego woman who was ticketed in October by the California Highway Patrol for wearing Google Glass while driving pleaded not guilty and will fight the citation in court, Yahoo reports. The woman, Cecilia Abadie, was pulled over for driving 80 miles per hour in a 65-mph zone.

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