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Back when Ally Financial was known as GMAC Financial, the U.S. Treasury gave it $17.2 billion in TARP funds to weather the global economic crisis. GMAC is now Ally Financial, and although it has repaid $5.4 billion of what it was loaned, there doesn't seem to be a clear path for repaying the outstanding amount. Bloomberg reports that Ally's mortgage unit, Residential Captial (ResCap), is teetering on the ledge of bankrupcty, and its banking operations didn't perform well in the Federal Reserve's

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Ally Financial, formerly GMAC Financial, has filed the paperwork necessary for an Initial Public Offering. The Detroit News reports that the filing will go to the Securities and Exchange Commission for approval before Ally can go public; a process that could take months. The federal government, which owns 74 percent of the lending arm due to its $17.2 billion 2009 bailout, is the only party listed as a stockholder.

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"The panel is deeply concerned that Treasury has not required GMAC to lay out a clear path to viability or a strategy for fully repaying taxpayers." This, according to a Congressional Oversight Panel that was created as a watchdog for the U.S. Treasury's Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) funds. The fix? Potentially breaking GMAC up into units and merging its auto lending business back into General Motors.

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Following the lead set by Chrysler Financial in the United States, GM Canada has announced that it will no longer offer leases through its GMAC Financial arm. While Chrysler LLC has not officially cut out lease deals in Canada, dealers up north report that the rates being offered to them are far too high to be feasible. GMAC spokeswoman Gina Proia told Bloomberg, "There's just a lack of funding in that country for lease assets." Both Chrysler LLC and GMAC are owned in part by Cerberus Capital Ma

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