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105Stock buyback gives GM execs permission to use corporate jets again

General Motors executives are once again certified members of the jet set. As you may recall, one of the concessions made by automakers in accepting government assistance back in 2009 was a requirement to discontinue the use of private jets in lieu of standard commercial airline flights. The issue first reared its head after the three auto CEOs from Detroit flew in private jets to Washington to outline why the industry needed bailout money. Not so smart.

31Report: GM CEO Whitacre still flies on AT&T jets equipped with golden parachutes

When U.S. domestic automakers were commuting back and forth between Detroit and Washington while begging for government funds in the fall of 2008, a big deal was made of the fact that their CEOs were traveling in private jets instead of driving company vehicles. The backlash from JetGate was substantial, as each automaker quickly ended the use of expensive airfare for corporate travel and signed on with less pricey charter services. But while the private jet became taboo for auto executives, oth

8No more private jets for GM

Surprise! General Motors has announced that it's ceasing its dedicated Corporate Aviation Operations. This means that all of its jets, leased or owned, will be sold or transferred to another operator. Additionally, the automaker had been leasing a facility and space from Detroit Metro Airport for the use of its private jets, and The General will now need to work with airport officials to find a new tenant. The entire General Motors Air Transportation Services group will see its doors officially

22Grounded: GM cancels all corporate jet service

General Motors has an early New Years Resolution: to be more fiscally responsible when it comes to corporate travel. With six short, direct sentences (see official press release after the jump), GM has declared that its Corporate Aviation Operations are to be shuttered. It might not seem like a big deal on the surface, but there are apparently numerous contractual agreements that need to be reworked to make this a reality. First, the jets themselves need to be returned, sold or transferred to an

35Are private jets the real problem with Detroit?

A great deal of fuss has been made over the last week or so about the travel arrangements of the leaders of the Detroit 3 automakers. By now, you're surely aware that Rick Wagoner of General Motors, Alan Mulally at Ford and Bob Nardelli at Chrysler traveled to our nation's capital to discuss Federal loans for their prospective companies in private jets. Yeah, not the smartest way to travel when you are begging for money. So, have you really explored all of your cash-saving options? Perhaps not.

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