47 Articles
1 / 3

The bankruptcy judge deciding whether New GM is responsible for ignition switch cases from before 2009 is putting all of the suits on hold until the US Court of Appeals decides whether to uphold his ruling.


The US Department of Transportation has decided to extend its regulatory supervision over General Motors for an additional year. The government agency believes that the oversight is a proactive way to address possible safety defects.


The attorneys at the GM Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility are now reporting a total of 90 confirmed deaths and 163 injuries in their latest progress report.


In the latest release from the GM Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility the number of deaths grows to 87 people, 3 more than the previous week, and injuries remain at 157.


The GM Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility continues its weekly release of deaths and injuries caused by the automaker's bad ignition switch. In the latest tally, it records 84 deaths and a total of 157 people harmed.


In the latest tally released by the General Motors Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility, the number of cases offered compensation for fatalities has risen to 74 people. There have also been 126 injuries linked to the automaker's faulty part.


General Motors received 33 more claims to its ignition-switch claim facility this week, which pushed the total to 4,345. The number of accepted cases increased by eight, including one fatality and seven injuries.


General Motors received 75 more claims from people about the automaker's faulty ignition switches. The number of eligible claims jumped up by 12, including four more for deaths and eight more for injuries.


Michael Mikkikin, the general council for General Motors, announced his retirement from the automaker last year. However, he now might not leave until July, while the company searches for a successor.


The General Motors ignition switch compensation fund received 57 more reports this week that were postmarked before the January 31 deadline. The number of accepted claims ticked up slightly by one additional death and two more injuries.


As the appeal process closes for General Motors' ignition switch recall compensation fund, the tally of claims stands at 4,180. That number might climb, though, because claims postmarked January 31 are still being accepted. As of the latest total, the attorneys found 51 deaths and 77 injures caused by the faulty parts.


The General Motors ignition switch compensation fund has the macabre task of determining whether to pay settlements to those hurt by the automaker's faulty parts. The group, led by attorney Kenneth Feinberg, has been accepting claims since August 1, and the latest statistics have brought to light quite a grisly figure. It has now offered 100 people remuneration for injuries or deaths due to the bad switches.


A woman in Texas is celebrating a cleared criminal record after being exonerated in a fatal crash now linked to General Motors' faulty ignition switches. Candice Anderson was driving a Saturn Ion in 2004 when she struck a tree. The incident injured her and killed her boyfriend in the front passenger seat. When investigators found no skid marks or signs of evasion and a small amount of Xanax in her system, Anderson was indicted on a charge of intoxicated manslaughter and eventually pleaded guilty


It appears that General Motors began preparing for its ignition switch recall far earlier than previously known. According to emails viewed by The Wall Street Journal, a contract worker for the automaker allegedly placed an order for 500,000 replacement ignition switches from Delphi to prepare for the repairs on December 18, 2013. However, the actual recall for the parts wasn't announced until two months later in February 2014, and it had to be expanded several times afterwards to cover an incre


Attorneys are continuing to fight to prove that the recalls from General Motors this year allegedly affect vehicle resale values. A $10 billion lawsuit, which is hoping to obtain class-action status, could cover as many as 27 million vehicles and consolidates hundreds of smaller claims. This latest case appears to be related to the one from June in California but is now in a New York court. Both are brought by the law firm Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP.


It appears that the safety problems stemming from General Motors' faulty ignition switches may stretch further than the automaker as admitted to. In a new interview with CNN Money, Kenneth Feinberg, the lawyer overseeing the settlement process for GM, says that there are at least 19 deaths and 12 injuries being compensated so far. That's more than the 13 fatalities originally claimed by the automaker.


"We didn't understand the enormity of the situation at the beginning, because I don't think management did," said board chairman Theodore Solso to the NYT.


This has been a bad year for recalls. The US auto industry broke the record for repair campaigns months ago, and with about 25.8 million vehicles needing fixed, General Motors has gotten close to 2013's total full-year figure of 27.96-million recalled cars all on its own. You might think that used car buyers would run screaming for the hills from all these faulty models, but a recent study finds the exact opposite to be true. In fact, one of The General's vehicles actually gained value slightly,


Plaintiffs may not meet certain requirements that would entitle them to damages via a compensation fund

A lawsuit filed in a New York court Tuesday seeks damages on behalf of more than 650 people allegedly injured or killed in General Motors' defective cars.


Given General Motors' steady stream of recalls this year (including a single day with around 8.4 million vehicles needing repair), it's not a huge surprise that the cost to deal with all of the problems will be high. However, few analysts expected the tab to be this steep. In the General's just-announced second-quarter financial filing, it revealed that net income for the quarter was just $200 million, compared to 1.2 billion in Q2 2013 – a drop of over 80 percent. To put this in proper pe


New documents have revealed that a current General Motors vice president, Doug Parks, was aware of the ignition switch problems on the Chevrolet Cobalt as early as 2005. At the time, Parks, whom Bloomberg called a "confidante" of CEO Mary Barra and an integral part of GM's product development team, was the chief engineer on the Cobalt and Saturn Ion. Congressional investigators uncovered the documents, which include an email from Parks and meeting attendance lists for the ignition switch problem

1 / 3
Share This Post