11 Articles
1 / 1
136

The US Treasury has announced a $9.7 billion loss on the $49.5 billion it used to bailout General Motors in 2009, according to a report from the The Detroit News, which in turn cites the quarterly report from the Special Inspector General of the Troubled Asset Relief Program to Congress.

28

In the spring of 2009, General Motors took a break from swimming in the political pool. Now that it's done toweling off the bankruptcy blues, The General is reportedly ready for another dip. According to The Wall Street Journal, the Detroit automaker has just lifted a self-imposed political spending ban by handing out $90,500 for select candidates running in the November elections.

83

While General Motors is busy making marketing hay from its early payoff of $5.8 billion in loans, Senator Chuck Grassley and House Representative Darrell Issa aren't buying it. "It looks like GM merely used one source of TARP funds to repay another," said Grassley of General Motors financial moves. Grassley has asked for justification of the creative money-shuffling from Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.

108

When Former President George W. Bush spoke to the Montreal Board of Trade recently, he made a public appeal to the Obama administration to "get out of the private sector," adding "I hope our government gets out of the autos and the financials in which they have a stake." His premise is that it takes private companies to turn an economy around, not government-run ones.

11

The short version: old General Motors is worthless, new General Motors is... well, less worthless. The Securities and Exchange Commission has already warned us that Motors Liquidation Company, the new name for the leftover scraps of GM, is not expected to return any value to stockholders. Despite this, the stock still has a fractional dollar value assigned to it, and some investors are still trading it. Yesterday, shares dipped 52%, closing at 55 cents.

39

After only 40 days in bankruptcy, General Motors emerged today as the new GM (sans green logo, for now). While the bankruptcy was about as short and sweet as they come, the future is what everyone is most interested in, and it's kind of looking a lot like the present/past.

121

The far right wing of the American political spectrum has begun channeling its displeasure over the federal government's involvement in the restructuring of General Motors into calls for a boycott of the company's products. Reportedly spearheaded by right wing pundits and radio show hosts, the boycott would be a response to the U.S. government taking a 60% stake in GM in exchange for forgiving most of the tens of billions of dollars loaned to the company over the last six months.

27

Not that it should come as a major shock to anyone paying attention over the last few weeks, but in a regulatory filing submitted by General Motors on Tuesday, the beleaguered automaker has admitted that it's unlikely to have acceptable deals negotiated with the either the United Auto Workers or Canadian Auto Workers unions before the previously announced deadline of May 27.

51

According to a lengthy report by the New York Times, the Treasury Department is directing General Motors to begin work on a bankruptcy filing by June 1. Based on sources close to the talks who were unable to officially discuss the process, the report outlines the "fast 'surgical' bankruptcy" of the automaker if GM is unable to reach an agreement with the UAW and bondholders to exchange some $28 billion in debt into equity in the automaker.

65

Despite recent rumblings to the contrary, both General Motors and Chrysler claim that they will not be going bankrupt any time soon. Still, as much as the two American automakers would love to quell fears of unsustainable liquidity, questions remain, especially as the pickup market in the United States continues to dwindle. In a note sent out to dealers, Chrysler's Jim Press and Steven Landry say that the automaker will focus its efforts on small cars for the rest of this year, though the curren

1 / 1
Share This Post