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37Fukushima radiation still showing up in some Japanese cars

In the wake of the 2011 tsunami that caused a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, there was a fear that radioactive cars and trucks could be bound for export. Within days of the tragedy, Nissan was already testing its vehicles' radiation levels (pictured above), and the rest of the Japanese auto industry followed soon after. However, three years after the natural disaster, it appears that some used models are still making it out and winding up on the roads in Central

AddNuclear energy and the Nissan Leaf

Read into this what you will, but Nissan may have given a subtle hint that it would prefer to have its all-electric Leafs powered by something safer than electricity make at a nuclear plant. The reason? The Japanese automaker recently presented a Leaf to an award-winning actor who starred in a dramatic film inspired by the deadly Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown in 2011.

22Reputation of electric cars takes a hit in Japan due to tsunami aftermath?

Electric vehicle owners like to think of themselves as green, but that color may be taking on a more glowing, radioactive hue in Japan.

45Reputation of electric cars takes a hit in Japan due to tsunami aftermath?

Electric vehicle owners like to think of themselves as green, but that color may be taking on a more glowing, radioactive hue in Japan.

14Honda denies Asimo being modified for nuclear clean up

ASIMO is the humanoid robot created by Honda that looks like a diminutive moonman who loves to slowly climb stairs. The four-foot three-inch robot is capable of a lot more than ascending stairways faster than the elderly, however, and rumors were swirling that ASIMO might be outfitted to handle nuclear cleanup duty.

AddFollowing devastating earthquake, Elon Musk helping Fukushima go solar

In the last few months, Japan's Fukushima Prefecture has suffered through an enormous earthquake, devastating tsunami, and the frightening meltdown of multiple nuclear reactors. Not exactly the best set of circumstances. Though local and national officials have been working to restore services and and infrastructure, it's understandable that prefecture communities are still suffering from the damage caused this triptych of disaster.

5Japenese automakers will work on weekends to protect power grid

Japan is still struggling to repair itself in the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, and the country's auto industry is looking to help out wherever it can. Automotive News reports that automakers and suppliers will work weekends and take off Thursdays and Fridays in an effort to ease pressure on the nation's power grid. The March 11 earthquake wiped out eight percent of the country's overall electricity capacity, which means that a lot of folks in Japan will need to cut back on consum

11Quake damaged paint plant comes back online in Japan

The March 11 earthquake and resultant tsunami in Japan rocked the country's automotive supply chain, leaving many suppliers with damaged factories and unreliable power. One nearly immediate impact was that automakers like Ford, Toyota and Chrysler could no longer offer colors like red or black.

16See how Nissan checks its cars for radiation

Nissan radiation testing – Click above to watch video after the jump

13Report: Japanese automakers will test vehicles for radiation before export

Japan continues to struggle from the effects of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, and one of the biggest issues facing the nation has been the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. The facility is now a grade seven nuclear disaster, which puts it on the same scale as the Chernobyl disaster in Russia during the 1980s.

24Report: Nissan to check radiation levels on cars tabbed for export

As fears of radiation from Japan's severely compromised Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant seem to be growing by the minute, automakers have tried to assure car buyers that most of their products are produced far enough away from the crippled facility that fallout won't end up on vehicles, but a report from Kicking Tires shows that Nissan wants to go a step further.

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