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AddEPA proposes new Tier 3 emission rules, requiring cleaner cars and gasoline in 2017

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added a new word to the wider public lexicon today when it proposed new emission and fuel standards for cars and gasoline: Tier 3. This new regulation is "sensible" and will "significantly reduce harmful pollution, prevent thousands of premature deaths and illnesses, while also enabling efficiency improvements in the cars and trucks we drive," the EPA says. Unsurprisingly, not everyone agrees.

6254.5 MPG fuel rule negotiations were not harmonious

If you assumed that the federal mandate requiring automakers to reach the 54.5 miles per gallon corporate average fuel economy standard by 2025 was negotiated cordially and ended in a group hug, think again. Verbal fisticuffs and head butting would be more accurate descriptions, with members of Congress and automakers joining the squabble with the federal regulatory agencies. During the negotiation process, foreign automakers took umbrage with more favorable treatment domestic makers seemed to b

125California low-carbon fuel regulation ruled unconstitutional by judge

Federal judge Lawrence J. O'Neill of the U.S. District Court in Fresno has stopped implementation of a California law that favors fuel producers with lower greenhouse gas emissions as part of the production process. The New York Times reports the judge has ruled that the regulation is an over-reach on California's part, one that attempts to regulate what goes on outside the borders of the state (it "unconstitutionally discriminates against out-of-state producers").

3Ceres defending 60-mpg CAFE standard for 2025, attacks Auto Alliance

With the proposed 56.2 mile per gallon corporate average fuel economy standards standards by 2025 under attack by the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, there was a need for someone to defend high mpg calls. In stepped Ceres, a nonprofit that leads a coalition of organizations and public interest groups to address sustainability and global climate change. Ceres has been running radio ads in Washington, D.C. and Michigan explaining the economic benefits of higher CAFE standards which is the ex

26Report: Automakers airing ads attacking proposed 56 mpg fuel standard

Automakers are already on the attack against President Barack Obama's proposed 56 mpg corporate average fuel economy standards by 2025. The Detroit Free Press is reporting that automakers have launched a radio ad campaign against the proposed targets in seven states, including Michigan. The ads say that requiring the auto industry to meet the steep fuel economy increases will cause higher vehicle prices, fewer vehicle options and, worst of all, job losses. Advocates of the 56 mpg standard claim

62Automakers airing ads attacking proposed 56 mpg fuel standard

Automakers are already on the attack against President Barack Obama's proposed 56 mpg corporate average fuel economy standards by 2025. The Detroit Free Press is reporting that automakers have launched a radio ad campaign against the proposed targets in seven states, including Michigan. The ads say that requiring the auto industry to meet the steep fuel economy increases will cause higher vehicle prices, fewer vehicle options and, worst of all, job losses. Advocates of the 56 mpg standard claim

35Study: Improving fuel efficiency doesn't come cheap

2011 Chevrolet Volt – Click above for high-res image gallery

10Report: Obama kicks off drive to enact tough fuel economy standards through 2025

A year ago, the White House led the effort to get automakers' Corporate Average Fuel Economy to 35.5 miles per gallon by 2016. Although the number was eventually pegged at 34.1 mpg, it will actually be slightly lower because of other non-automotive credits that will be applied. One might have thought automakers would still be grousing the work that needs to be done, but in fact they encouraged the federal government to go further, and so it has: the White House began working this week on setting

73Report: Obama kicks off drive to enact tough fuel economy standards through 2025

A year ago, the White House led the effort to get automakers' Corporate Average Fuel Economy to 35.5 miles per gallon by 2016. Although the number was eventually pegged at 34.1 mpg, it will actually be slightly lower because of other non-automotive credits that will be applied. One might have thought automakers would still be grousing the work that needs to be done, but in fact they encouraged the federal government to go further, and so it has: the White House began working this week on setting

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