67 Articles
1 / 4
NEXT
AddEPA to scrutinize auto fuel economy tests, issue revised guidelines

Following the lowering of estimated fuel economy figures from companies like Ford, Hyundai, Kia and even a handful of Mercedes-Benz sedans in the recent past, the Environmental Protection Agency is cracking down by mandating new mileage testing procedures by the end of the year, after first considering some changes months ago. The improved evaluations should make the numbers that buyers see on the window sticker of a vehicle closer to what they experience in the real world.

AddSouth Korea firms up fuel economy regs following Hyundai/Kia debacle

According to a report from Reuters, South Korea's government has drafted strict new rules for automakers to follow when calculating fuel economy. The legislation comes after a major snafu by Hyundai and Kia that resulted in the automakers lowering the estimated fuel mileage of many popular models – some by several miles per gallon, including the Soul subcompact above – and compensating owners in the US and Canada for the reduction.

AddCarmakers taking advantage of EU fuel economy test by taping up seams, overinflating tires

Automakers don't necessarily sell the same vehicles in both North America and Europe, but a new report from the Continent's Transport And Environment makes it sound like the fuel-economy rating... questions we've seen here in the US might also be happening across The Pond. Well, except over there it sounds like full-on legal cheating.

AddAct Surprised: Hyundai, Kia sued over inflated fuel mileage ratings

You knew this was coming. Shortly after Hyundai and Kia admitted that their internal processes for calculating fuel economy were flawed, resulting in a major program to compensate drivers for lower-than-advertised mile-per-gallon numbers and the re-rating of a large percentage of the two-headed Korean automaker's vehicles, we have word of a lawsuit.

AddHow the EPA tests - and doesn't test - fuel economy of new vehicles

Doesn't the EPA test the fuel economy of all new vehicles? Actually, no.

AddLies, Damned Lies and Fuel Economy Numbers

Taking A Detailed Look At Why 'Your Mileage May Vary'

AddSurvey Says: Fuel economy is #1 factor when buying a car

It seems like it was just a few years ago that car manufacturers used to laugh at us when we'd ask why a new model didn't get any better fuel economy than its outgoing predecessor. "Car buyers don't care about fuel economy," was the refrain, "They certainly won't pay for it."

AddSurvey Says: Fuel economy is #1 factor when buying a car

It seems like it was just a few years ago that car manufacturers used to laugh at us when we'd ask why a new model didn't get any better fuel economy than its outgoing predecessor. "Car buyers don't care about fuel economy," was the refrain, "They certainly won't pay for it."

AddCalifornia breaks rank again, demands over 15% of cars sold be non-polluting by 2025

Less than a year after everyone with any sort of say in the matter seemed to agree that 54.5 miles per gallon by the year 2025 was a properly attainable goal, the California Air Resources Board has decided to change things up a bit.

AddCalifornia breaks rank again, demands over 15% of cars sold be non-polluting by 2025

Less than a year after everyone with any sort of say in the matter seemed to agree that 54.5 miles per gallon by the year 2025 was a properly attainable goal, the California Air Resources Board has decided to change things up a bit.

AddReport: Obama administration proposes 2025 CAFE of 56.2 mpg

The Obama Administration has reportedly disclosed its CAFE target for 2025, and it's not the 62 miles per gallon that's been discussed in Washington, D.C. for some time now.

AddYet another reason to switch to gallons per mile

Pop quiz: Say you split your driving evenly between a 21 mpg SUV and a 75 mpg Vespa scooter. What would your average miles per gallon be? If you answered 48 mpg you're not alone, as that's what Vespa came up with in their infographic we posted last week (reposted above). The only problem is that that answer is wrong. The real average is 32.8 mpg.The reason for the large difference is that in order to correctly calculate average mpg, you can't simply add both numbers and divide by two. You have t

AddCAFE 2025 debate heating up over 62 mpg limit

A CAFE standard of up to 62 miles per gallon by 2025, which we first heard about last October, will certainly increase the cost of vehicles, but by how much varies depending upon who you ask. Automotive News (via AutoWeek) has gathered a few opinions and estimations on how this will affect vehicle pricing and people's pocket books over the life of a vehicle.

AddHow much will the EPA's new fuel economy standards cost each automaker?

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, it will cost automakers an average of $948 to meet the 34.1 mile per gallon Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards that will be adopted in the United States in 2016. The current standard sits at 27.5 mpg. The EPA estimates that the average owner will save some $4,000 in fuel costs over the life of the vehicle, resulting in a net savings of over $3,000 per owner.

AddHow much will the EPA's new fuel economy standards cost each automaker?

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, it will cost automakers an average of $948 per car to meet the 34.1 mile per gallon Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards that will be adopted in the United States in 2016. The current standard sits at 27.5 mpg. The EPA estimates that the average owner will save some $4,000 in fuel costs over the life of the vehicle, resulting in a net savings of over $3,000 per owner.

AddEPA: Average fuel economy hit 22.4 mpg, a new record, in 2009

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, which first started keeping track of such things way back in 1975 around the time of the first fuel crisis in America, the average fuel economy of all vehicles sold in the U.S. hit a record high in 2009. For those favoring hard data, that equals 22.4 miles per gallon. Not surprisingly, average fuel economy has been on an upward path over the last several years (excluding a small dip in 2008).

AddHyundai CEO Krafcik targets 50 mpg by 2025, but that figure isn't as high as you think

2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

AddHyundai CEO targets 50 mpg by 2025, but that figure isn't as high as you think

2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

AddConfirmed: U.S. considering 62 mpg CAFE target by 2025

A CAFE standard of 62 miles per gallon by 2025 might indeed come to pass. The Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency today released a "Notice of Intent to Improve Fuel Economy and Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions for 2017-2025" (PDF) that includes, as one possibility, decreasing greenhouse gas emissions by six percent a year for the years in question. A drop that steep would put us on track for 62 mpg, but the agencies are also looking at three, four and five percent

1 / 4
NEXT