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AddAuto industry supports Obama's newly announced long-term mpg standards

President Obama recently announced plans to define fuel economy regulations beyond 2016. He briefly outlined a new plan that would regulate the mileage requirements of cars and light trucks through 2025 and medium- and heavy-duty trucks through 2018. The overall goal of his plan is quite simple: create a national, long-term standard for fuel economy and emissions.

AddReport: Canada reveals first-ever vehicle emissions standards that looks awfully familiar

Following the lead of the U.S., Canada has chosen to employ a fuel economy regulation program for the first time ever, and the numbers are virtually identical to ours. The differences between the two countries' programs are so minute that you could essentially say Canada copied our new Corporate Average Fuel Economy guidelines that require automakers to achieve a fleet average fuel economy of around 35 mpg by 2016. Prior to this, Canada had some emissions guidelines, but didn't require complianc

16Report: Canada reveals first-ever vehicle emissions standards that looks awfully familiar

Following the lead of the United States, Canada has reportedly chosen to employ a fuel economy regulation program for the first time ever, and it's virtually identical to ours. According to the Times Colonist, the differences between the two countries' programs are so minute that you could essentially say Canada has copied our new Corporate Average Fuel Economy guidelines that require automakers to achieve a fleet average fuel economy of around 35 mpg by 2016. Prior to this, Canada did issue emi

AddWhat's the real cost of new CAFE regulations? Millions, billions, nothing?

News of new CAFE regulations that would push mileage requirements up significantly came just days ago. The numbers are set and automakers will have to aim high, sort of, to hit the target of 35 miles per gallon by 2016. Several reports have stated that meeting these goals will add an average of $985 to the price of a new car by 2016. Estimates have also come in showing that automakers will spend a staggering $51.5 billion over the next five years to meet the new requirements. So, what's the real

AddNew Federal CAFE standards officially released, 34.1 mpg by 2016

We knew it was coming. Today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency jointly released new Federal CAFE fuel mileage and greenhouse gas emissions requirements that will cover the 2012 through 2016 model years. The estimated fleet-wide fuel economy standard has been set at 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016, though improvements in air conditioning systems will bring that number up to around 35 mpg. That equals a standard of roughly 250 grams of carbon

31AAA survey says fuel mileage paramount in consumers minds

In a sign that the high cost of gasoline has finally struck a central nerve, car shoppers today are reportedly more concerned about fuel economy than they are about the brand of vehicle when shopping for a new car. In addition, consumers want more government control over fuel economy. This startling news, and a reversal of consumer trends two years ago, is the result of a new AAA survey which studied consumers' attitudes towards fuel prices.

13Sixty-four House Reps ask President to favor softer fuel economy bill

A group of Congressmen and women wrote a letter to the principal -- President Bush -- and told him not to pay attention to what the other students are saying. The sixty-four representatives requested that President Bush choose the house version of the fuel economy bill still being debated in Congress, not the Senate version.

AddCerberus chairman: Senate's CAFE bill unfair to auto industry

It's my equity firm and I'll cry if I want to. Cerberus Chairman John Snow has hopefully for the time being satiated his craving for whine after his address to the Detroit Economic Club. Apparently he thinks he knows all since he helped design the first CAFE standards 31 years ago. Impressive. He stated that the "one-sided" standards, if passed, will put domestic car companies out of business, cost the U.S. lots of jobs, and make him cry. I added that last part.

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