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13Yellow-Flagged: Formula One's French Grand Prix and IPO potentially on hold

It is exceptionally rare for Bernie Ecclestone to be shown the yellow flag when it comes to his Formula One business dealings, but that's what happened with two of his projects. A month ago, Ecclestone agreed to terms with France's sports minister David Douillet to reinstate the French Grand Prix at the Paul Ricard circuit (which Ecclestone happens to own). The contract hadn't been signed while minor details were settled, but the plan was that the French GP would alternate with the Belgian GP st

21F1 race in New Jersey could be postponed

After years of doing without a grand prix in the United States altogether, Formula One is gearing up to return to these shores in a big way. The United States Grand Prix is set to take place later this year at the newly constructed Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. And next year, the Grand Prix of America is scheduled to join the calendar in New Jersey, just across the river from Manhattan. But will the Jersey race be ready in time?

14Euro Disney Grand Prix plans shelved

We're not sure what has more clout: Mickey Mouse, Alain Prost or 60 million euros, but the combination of the three was still not enough to get the French Grand Prix back on track. The race, previously held at the Magny Cours circuit in rural France, was removed from the 2009 calendar after organizers couldn't cough up the cash, and almost immediately other parties began filing queue to acquire the rights. The leading tender was spearheaded by Prost, the French former world champion, and backed

18Au revoir, Magny-Cours: 2009 French Grand Prix cancelled

The French are getting screwed out of their Formula One fix. A little over a week after French Canadians began mourning the Canadian Grand Prix's cancellation from the 2009 F1 calendar, word comes that the French Grand Prix has also been nixed. The GP's promoter, the Federation du Sport Automobile (FFSA), announced the race's cancellation yesterday and blamed it on finances, though we find it hard to believe that even an F1 race in Europe can't make money in these tough economic times. With the

11FIA bans BMW's vertical nose fins

The FIA has gone ahead and banned BMW-Sauber's controversial vertical nose fins that first appeared on the team's F1 car two weekends ago at Magny-Cours for the French Grand Prix. The team claims that the vertical wings, nicknamed the "Twin Towers" after the Petronas Towers – the world's tallest buildings – in Malaysia, aid downforce at the front of the car, but the FIA cited safety concerns for their decision to toss them from the track. The governing body claimed the wings could im

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