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36Man who drove Bugatti Veyron into lake pleads guilty, faces 20 years in prison [w/video]

Remember the guy who caught on video driving a Bugatti Veyron into the Gulf Bay in Texas? Well, he's now facing a few decades behind bars. You might wonder why some seriously bad driving in a million-dollar supercar could lead to such a long stint in the slammer. Well, Andy Lee House of Lufkin, TX, pled guilty to wire mail fraud in federal court in the Eastern District of Texas. As it turns out, crashing the car was all about getting an insurance payout.

12Singapore car salesman jailed for gambling away $280k Maserati deposit

Kenny Rogers' country classic The Gambler is right about two things: you gotta know when to hold'em and know when to fold'em. A former Maserati salesman in Singapore is learning that lesson about when to step away from the table, after being sentenced to 33 months in prison for allegedly gambling away a customer's deposit of 350,000 Singapore dollars ($280,800).

228Police Charge 41 In Insurance Scam Involving Dead Deer

Mechanic stored deer carcasses, blood and fur to fool insurence adjusters

Forty-one people in Philadelphia are facing charges in what prosecutors call an elaborate insurance fraud scheme that used dead deer to fake car accidents.

10Edmunds settles with marketing firm accused of faking dealer reviews

Back in July, Edmunds sued a Texas company named Humankind Design Ltd. for fraud and breach of contract. Among other services, Humankind Design claims to be an online reputation management company, but the lawsuit says that the site created 2,200 fake accounts in order to post positive dealerships reviews on Edmunds.com.

36Pedestrian fakes hilariously bad hit, foiled by Russian dash cam

After the Good-Samaritan-fest that was the last Russian dash cam video, it's back to our regularly scheduled program of scamming and madness. This time, it's a woman who attempts to pretend she's been hit by a car and rendered unconscious, the same tired con-job that happens to be one of the primary reasons that Russians probably perform more surveillance on themselves than the state does.

151This Is Why Russians Have Dash Cams

Woman fakes being hit, but the driver has it all on camera

Have you ever wondered why every great dash cam video comes from Russia? Wonder no more. This dash cam footage found on autoevolution.com captures the kind of fraud Russian drivers deal with every day.

12Fraudster turned non-existent biofuel into luxury cars, sentenced to 12 years

Rodney Hailey, who was in the news last summer for selling more than $9 million in Renewable Identification Numbers (RIN) credits for biofuel that, well, didn't exist, has been sentenced to nearly 12 years and six months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release.

16Why did a biodiesel train cross US-Canada border over and over again?

Biodiesel appears to be a tough business to enter, whether you're talking lawsuits over federal mandates or crackdowns on fraud. CBC News in Canada has investigated a cross-border mystery over biodiesel that thickens the plot.

AddMore arrests in biodiesel RIN fraud cases

Alternative energy and cleantech have been a platform for political jabs and Congressional hearings in Washington over the past year – the Solyndra scandal, Chevrolet Volt post-crash-test battery fires, and Fisker Automotive's Department of Energy grant loan quickly come to mind. The latest one deals with companies committing fraud tied into the federal renewable fuel standard, and it's not pretty.

30Was that viral photo of a motorcycle cop crash-landing into convertible a scam?

The LA Weekly reports there may have been more to the viral news story of a motorcycle police officer who ended up with his legs in the air in the back seat of a BMW convertible after a traffic collision. Following an 18-month investigation, prosecutors have officially dropped the three misdemeanor assault charges against driver Brian Hitchcock after the man's lawyers discovered Hermosa, California officer Anthony Parente had a history of questionable accidents and hefty workers' compensation cl

73Infamous Bugatti offshore excursion going to trial for insurance fraud [w/video]

It appears the gentleman who piloted his Bugatti Veyron into a Texas lagoon has run into a spot of legal trouble. The insurance company that paid out $2 million for the trashed exotic is calling fraud on the whole scenario, and a federal judge has decided that the claim should go before a jury. Andy House of Lufkin, Texas, originally purchased the Veyron after securing an interest-free $1 million loan from Lloyd Gillespie. Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company alleges House attempted to pay a

36Inmates, deceased among those who scored 2009 auto tax break

When Cash For Clunkers was announced in 2009, the federal government promised to keep close tabs on the vouchers that were paid out in exchange for clunkers. Problem is, the program led to 4.3 million taxpayers receiving $7.2 billion if vehicle deductions in the span of only a few months. So it should come as little surprise that some less-than-reputable deals passed through the C4C juggernaut, including vouchers for criminals in jail, dead people and children.

24Report: Honda owners' accounts hacked, millions of customers at risk

The Internet has indeed revolutionized the way people do business, but this doesn't come without some faults. Hackers pose a threat to not only individual people's computers, but to the databases of large corporations, and a recent attack on American Honda now means that 2.2 million owners have had their personal information stolen.

AddTennessee attorney gets 26-month sentence for defrauding biofuels subsidy program

67-year-old H. Max Speight, a disbarred Tennessee attorney, has been sentenced by a federal court and will serve a 26-month sentence for defrauding a federal biofuels subsidy program. Though his sentence may be considered harsh, Speight's partner, William Tacker II, was convicted and sentenced to five years behind bars, plus a mandatory repayment of funds, which he collected by filing fraudulent claims with the federal government.

11Edmunds.com shuts down fake websites, warns of scamming

Danger, car shoppers – no longer content to try and convince the gullible that a deposed African ruler needs help storing his millions, internet scammers are now using the Edmunds.com name and logo to try and swindle money away from car buyers. According to Edmunds, the company has already shut down two sites that were hawking a supposed Edmunds-backed escrow service. Once you handed over your hard-earned money to what was supposed to be a trusted third-party, the crooks dropped off the fa

4Rolex Series driver behind Ponzi scheme that bilked fellow drivers out of $5.4M?

Henri Zogaib (pictured, right) raced for and helped support the Samax Motorsport team that raced in the Rolex Series. The support came in the form of cash and good living that supposedly came from investing in iron ore, but apparently the monies actually came from a Ponzi scheme. And as the Orlando Sentinel tells it, the fraud has unravelled, leaving fellow Series drivers like Ryan Dalziel (pictured left), J. C. France, and Eddy Hennessy among those out hundreds of thousands of dollars.

6FOLLOWUP: Serious Fraud Office reportedly called in to investigate MG Rover collapse

The saga that is the collapse of MG Rover and the subsequent four-year government probe into what went wrong has just taken another sordid and oddly-timed twist. Lord Mandelson, Secretary of State for the British Labour Party, has told the Financial Times that he was under "obligation" to pass the case to the Serious Fraud Office (is there a "Not So Serious Fraud Office?") following his review of the findings into the last days of MG.

22REPORT: Tough times yield more insurance fraud cases

They're called owner "give-ups," and their rise is a sign of the tough economic times. Despondent over being financially strapped and unable to cover car payments, vehicle owners are ditching, sinking, or torching their vehicles and reporting the loss to collect insurance payoffs. According to authorities, most of the titleholders aren't seasoned criminals. In fact, many of the false claims are filed by first-time offenders -- people who normally wouldn't steal a piece of candy from a store. How

AddDaewoo's ex-chief receives jail sentence

Kim Woo-choong, the founder and former head of the Daewoo Group, was sentenced to 10 years in a South Korean prison for embezzlement, accounting fraud, and various other white-collar crimes of the type typically committed when a large company goes down the tubes. In all, Woo-choong was said to have been involved in a variety fraudulent transactions involving over $50B in company funds, as well as having embezzled $100M.

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