22 Articles
1 / 2

A big part of Ford's recent successes can be attributed to the "One Ford" mantra CEO Allan Mulally instituted early on. But while the program may be a recipe for success, speculation stemming from Mulally's comments at the 2010 Detroit Auto Show left some wondering if the next Ford Falcon would one day share a front-wheel drive platform with the Taurus.


Will the new Police Interceptor be a toughened Taurus SHO? - click above for high-res image gallery


Hold on to your sap gloves and night sticks – it's that time of the decade! An Autoblog source reveals that Ford is about to release a brand spankin' new Police Interceptor. Not only is this humongous news for our pals in the law enforcement community, but this is 120-point headline font for taxi companies around the country, as they typically buy old Police Interceptors with 90,000 miles on 'em and repurpose them as the cabs we all know and love passing out in. Why? Because Police Interce


Even though Ford honcho Alan Mulally was seriously smitten by the company's Aussie Falcon G-Series, doubts about the car's future were presaged nearly a year-and-a-half ago as Ford built momentum behind the "One Ford" program. That initiative focused on the rationalization of platforms, so multiplel vehicles sold around the world could share underpinnings and save the Blue Oval some bucks. But with new fuel mileage requirements, the fate of the rear-wheel drive Falcon began to grow dark.


In a surprise move, Ford has announced that it will pursue the development of an all-new Police Interceptor model. The move comes on the heels of General Motors' announcement that it plans to challenge the Crown Victoria's law enforcement dominance with its own heavy-duty Chevrolet Caprice sedan.


Bathurst 1000 fan enjoying a coldie during The Great Race


Click above to watch video after the jump


There's more than one way for Hollywood actors to go green. While most celebrities choose to go the way of Toyota Prius ownership, Eric Bana's chosen green ride is a 1973 Ford Falcon from Australia, a gas guzzler from a time that just barely predates most modern emissions equipment. That car, which is the title character in Bana's upcoming new movie Love The Beast, was modified to take part in the grueling Targa Tasmania Rally, and we doubt the list of upgrades included bits like catalytic conve


The Ford Falcon is all Australian. It has always been driven by the rear wheels, and it has always been designed, engineered, and built Down Under. The automotive world is rapidly changing, though, and Ford is one of many OEMs that are driving towards global vehicle architectures and a less diversified corporate parts bin. What does that mean for the Falcon? Nothing for quite a while, as the once hot-selling Aussie special just received major rework in April, and another redesign is many years a


"You guys are obsessed with rear wheel drive," Alan Mulally mused to the Australian press after a browbeating about which pair of wheels might propel the Falcon into the future. Try as they might, the Ford Chief would not be pinned down about the chassis architecture of future Falcons, saying only that the choice would be customer driven, and plugging front and all-wheel drive vehicles as "pretty spectacular."


The Australian auto market is an interesting beast. Many of the big players in America offer vehicles there which are completely different from what is available stateside. Ford and General Motors have continued to develop large, rear-wheel-drive passenger cars for the Australian market, and these have recently proven desirable in the states again. New fuel economy regulations, though, may put an end to the idea of importing Australian-designed Ford and Holden vehicles into America. In fact, eve


Holden and Ford have been fighting the battle of Commodore vs. Falcon for many years, and with the recent announcement of the new Falcon range, the war has heated up. Holden's very competent Holden line has been given quite a jolt in anticipation of the Falcon's release, with many offerings trumping Ford's recently introduced Falcon models.


Click image for photo gallery


click above image for high-res version


Seemingly overnight the Australian market has become the holy grail for a pair of U.S. auto giants. That's because both General Motors and Ford are considering taking advantage of rear-wheel drive platforms that have prospered on the island continent by exporting them to new markets, including the U.S. GM, of course, has plans to bring its RWD Zeta platform to the States and use it to underpin the new Chevy Camaro, Pontiac G8 and a few other cars that have yet to get the final go-ahead. Ford, me


Looky, looky. Spies from KGP have caught a rear-wheel drive Ford from Australia at Ford's engineering centers in Detroit. In fact, the car appears to be in the process of being unboxed after its long trip from Oz. What does it mean that this car, presumably a rear-wheel drive Falcon prototype, has landed on our shores? Well, let's start speculating.


We've been waiting for Ford to update its aged rear-wheel drive Falcon sedan in Australia ever since Holden started selling its redesigned and well-received Commodore. We haven't heard a peep about the new car until now. An intrepid enthusiast managed to capture two Falcon test mules, one of which is a high-performance XR model, on public roads recently. These are heavily disguised mules with camo cover front and rear, and the drivers never allowed our photographer friend to get ahead of them an

1 / 2
Share This Post