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The U.S. House of Representatives is investigating the motives behind the recent decision by Ford to pull an ad from its YouTube account that's critical of the government bailouts of General Motors and Chrysler, only later to restore it. Representative Darrell Issa, R-California, has asked Alan Mulally, president and CEO of Ford, for a "full and complete explanation" of his company's reasoning for temporarily pulling the ad. Earlier this week, Ford reportedly said that the ad was removed from th


We only know him as Chris, but his words are reverberating around the automotive and business sectors at the moment. He's the star of an unscripted Ford ad that puts real customers in front of not-so-real reporters. Chris was asked why buying American was important to him, and his response centers on the fact that Ford did not take bailout money unlike General Motors and Chrysler.


Back in 2009, at the absolute lowest point in the history of the American automobile industry, Chrysler and General Motors declared bankruptcy. The United States government set up a cabinet-level group called The Presidential Task Force On The Auto Industry was formed to allow the government to handle the courtroom proceedings that would end up allowing the two automotive giants the opportunity to get back on their feet.


When U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood opened the Detroit Auto Show last week and said that the Chevrolet Volt was, "obviously the kind of green car Americans are looking for," it was a slightly self-serving statement. After all, the government that LaHood works for owns a large share of General Motors (and Chrysler). Even though Ford didn't take a bailout from the government, Newsweek wanted to know just who's in charge of the Big Three these days. Their assessment? It's not anyone in


Bill Ford, great-grandson of Henry Ford himself, is reportedly hedging his bets on green technology for the automaker that bears his name. Ford has spoken directly with President-elect Barack Obama about energy, especially as it relates to the automotive industry, and the Blue Oval exec likes what he hears from our next President. According to Mr. Ford, he's shared his plans for his company's future with Obama and has plans to continue to do so. One big issue Bill Ford sees with future automotiv


"Thick and fast." That's the phrase that describes the opinions, pleas, advice, denunciations, and WTF? going on around the U.S. auto industry right now. Enter Congress, which is trying to figure out how to give Detroit automakers the $25 billion they were promised a few months ago. Congressmen are sounding off almost daily on what kinds of stipulations they want to attach to the loan/bailout/whatever you want to call it -- and that's just the ones who would vote for it at all.

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