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It's backing the "Skydrive" car that would soar 33 feet above the ground.

The 9.5 foot-long SkyDrive would be the "world's smallest" flying EV.

One rider, no wheels.

Company promises you can buy one by the end of the year.

AeroMobil created the AeroMobil 3.0 flying car.

Why have self-driving cars, when you can have self-flying cars?

Johnny Cab meets the Spinner.

Don't look for a production version anytime soon.

“Uber Elevate” is expected to be cheaper and quicker.

Helicopters won't cut it, so the company's eyeing VTOLs.

If all goes well – a big if, we might add – Vahana could be airborne as early as the end of 2017.

But we still wouldn't count on a flying Prius arriving in your local showroom.

Toyota's aerocar patent design can stow its wings inside the body, so it'll look normal (ish) on the road.

He's backing two start-ups that are working in competition to get the job done faster.

Toyota might be ready to take a stab at the flying car, as revealed by a patent drawing for a car with stackable wings.

Terrafugia shows a newly updated rendering for its TF-X flying car. Development on the flying cars with promises of monumental capabilities has gone on for years, with no products yet in the hands of consumers.

AeroMobil wants to have its flying car ready to sell to the public for 2017, but there's still a lot of development to get the vehicle ready for the road. In the future, the company even wants to make the plane autonomous.

There's something about the idea of the flying car that continues to grab people's attention – at least to anyone sitting unmoving in traffic who just wishes they could take off and fly away. Of course, that's not really possible, but it doesn't keep people from trying to make it a reality. It's not entirely a dream, either, because a company from Slovakia called AeroMobil has a solution that actually appears to work.

You sometimes get the impression that Tesla CEO Elon Musk says wild things just to gauge people's reactions. You have to be crazy to think that the Hyperloop is ever going to happen. Train travel is barely accepted in much of the country. Recently, he boasted in an interview with Britain's The Independent newspaper that he could build a flying car and a submersible one. If he's to be believed this time, one of them might actually happen.

We're trying to figure out how the term "range anxiety" will apply to the Terrafugia TF-X flying car. Is it going to be applicable to the pilot or to others in the sky? The reason we ask is because the vehicle is a plug-in hybrid, so those batteries better well be charged up. But, according to the potential manufacturer, flying the vehicle will require only five hours of training, so getting too close could produce a different kind of anxiety.

America's oldest catalogue offering the vehicle for $295,000

You may not be able to find it in a show room or take it for a test drive, but you can now own an actual flying car for the low, low price of $295,000.

A generous donation will get you a place on the flight crew

Want to be part of a real-life flying car's first test flight? This might be your chance, but it comes at a price.

Flying car concept 40 years in the making to take flight

It's 2013. We're living in the future, but where are all the flying cars? One inventor says he's received FAA approval to begin testing his flying car, another step towards making flying cars a reality.

Flying cars aren't an everyday sighting, but they aren't as unheard of these days as yo might suspect. Some, like the Maverick flying car, are already available to the public, while others have been stuck in the development phase for years, like the Terrafugia Transition. And before the Transition can make it to market, another flying car will hit the scene: Skyrunner. That new flying machine makes its public debut at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show this week.

A company in Bratislava, Slovakia is developing a flying car prototype which seems to have achieved the ultimate dream; a functional road car which can easily transition to a plane.

When it comes to flying cars (or driving planes), the recent vehicle that most often comes to mind is the Terrafugia Transition. But that street-legal flying car has experienced years of delays, and the Aeromobil 2.5, a much sexier-looking flying car designed and built in Slovakia, recently made its first test flight.

How close does the Terrafugia Transition come to fulfilling the Jetsonian promise of a flying car? To Terrafugia CEO Carl Dietrich's own admission, "we usually think of it more as an airplane that has the added capability of driving." Still, the Transition is unlike anything else in the sky or on the road, even if it's not exactly the futuristic flying car that Hanna-Barbera imagined back in the 1960s.

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