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AAA is getting ready for the EV era. After announcing roadside charging assistance for electric vehicles last summer, the company announced today that it is going to add charging station locations to its TripTik services, either online or with an app. It's all part of the brand's history of helping drivers, as the press release helpfully points out. 100 years ago, AAA made sure to note where the gas stations were on customer maps.


As automakers gear up to roll thousands of electric cars into showrooms and onto the open road, prospective buyers have to consider a basic question: When and where will I plug in?


If you want to be the first on your block to drive an EV like a Nissan Leaf, Chevrolet Volt or Mitsubishi i-MiEV, prepare for some schooling. The experience is not as simple as signing the papers for a Ford Fusion Hybrid or a Toyota Prius, not nearly.


Supercenter retailer Meijer Inc. plans to install electric vehicle charging stations at many of its Michigan area stores. The first charging station, installed at the Warren, MI Meijer store, is now operational, and perhaps coincidentally, is located across the street from GM's technical center, a site that has more than its fair share of Chevy Volts roaming around. The retailer's Allen Park store, also located on the state's east side, is slated for the next install. Then, plans shift to the we


2011 Chevrolet Volt plugs in at the RenCen – Click above for high-res image gallery


Imagine how convenient it would be if you could simply fill up your future electric vehicle (EV) at the gas station down the road, across town, or perhaps even the one that's located right off the exit ramp of your local expressway. Now, that's convenient charging that could push EVs to mass adoption, right? Well, that's the plan of Eaton Corporation and Murphy Oil USA. The duo have teamed up to demonstrate the benefits of fast, convenient charging located within the familiar environment of trad


Electric vehicles (EVs) may be dramatically less mechanically complex than their traditional internal combustion counterparts, but that's where the simplicity ends. The battle that began with Thomas Edison and Nicola Tesla over direct vs. alternating current continues to this day, the battlefield has just shifted to the EV powertrain. Electrochemical batteries can't store alternating current, the electrons will only flow directly in or out.


Nissan Motor Company has teamed up with Daikyo Incorporated, one of Japan's largest condominium builders, to jointly develop an electric vehicle charging infrastructure targeted directly at condo dwellers. Nissan and Daikyo will immediately begin work on their "Demonstration Project for EV Charging Infrastructure in Condominium Buildings."


As the U.S. readies for an expected onslaught of electric vehicles (EVs), the San Francisco Bay Area is quickly becoming one of the regions that's particularly well-prepared for EVs. In late 2008, mayors from the Bay Area joined together to approve a multi-billion dollar plan that would eventually bring thousands of EV charging stations to the area. This initial plan successfully kicked off an ongoing drive to bring even more chargers to the Bay Area.


Earlier this week, automotive execs came together to discuss the future of the industry at the Center for Automotive Research Management Briefing Seminars in Traverse City, MI. As Green Car Advisor reports, one of the sessions at the seminar was titled "Full-scale Deployment: Making the Business Case." This particular session focused on discussing the need for widespread deployment of public charging stations. However, the discussion quickly turned around as many panelists argued that there's si


By October 2011, the ChargePoint America program, assisted by Coulomb Technologies, is expected to complete installation of 4,600 free public and home charging stations funded by a $15-million grant from the U.S. government. The chargers will appear in nine regions across the U.S.: Austin, TX, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, Orlando, FL, Sacramento, CA, the San Jose/San Francisco Bay Area, Bellevue/Redmond, WA, and Washington D.C.


As potential Leaf owners move through the process of purchasing Nissan's groundbreaking electric vehicle, it has become quite clear that the company has each and every step planned out to the smallest detail. Last week, we reported that home charger quotes were rolling in and that Nissan was spot on with its estimate that an installed charging unit would set potential Leaf buyers back about $2,200. No problems there. But as news of the charging quotes circulated around, a group of Toyota RAV4 EV


Companies working to build streetside electric vehicle chargers face a lot of obstacles. From deciding where to install them to worries about vandals unplugging the cord, there are a lot of issues that have nothing to do with the vehicle or the charging technology. Earlier today, when thinking about Coulomb's first Manhattan charging station, which is in a parking garage, we thought about one more problem with street-based charging units: how do you stop non-electric vehicles from parking there.


The state of Washington is hoping to turn the interstate 5 corridor that runs from Canadian border to Oregon into the nation's first electric highway. With the help of a $1.32 million federal grant, Washington hopes to install between seven and 10 so-called Level 3 electric vehicle charging stations along the main north-south road. Level 3 stations charge at 400 volts and 30 amps or more. Such stations can charge a typical EV battery to 80 percent full in under 30 minutes.


According to a new study conducted by Pike Research, the number of electric vehicle (EV) charge points across the globe will reach 4.7 million by 2015. That's so many that the study suggests that the charging market will become overly crowded by next year.


More and more fast charging system will hit the streets over the next decade as electric vehicles become more common. As the market grows, more and more players will enter the space. One of them, Netherlands-based Epyon, showed off its new fast charger this week in Amsterdam along with a public display of the Nissan Leaf.


Mitsubishi i-MiEV - Click above for high-res image gallery


With the growing fame of the Tesla Roadster and imminent release of the Nissan Leaf, it seems like everyone is trumpeting electric cars these days. Yet a troubling question remains: How are we going to create an infrastructure for charging?

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