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Electric vehicles camped in parking spaces will be an ideal vehicle-to-grid energy source for buildings equipped with energy management systems. A new report from Navigant Research forecasts that nearly 200,000 plug-in electric vehicles equipped with vehicle-to-building (V2B) technology will be sold from 2012 through 2020.


The Detroit News reports that China's Wanxiang Group Corporation will acquire almost all of bankrupt A123 Systems Inc. for $256 million. The deal includes all of the American battery manufacturer's grid and commercial business assets as well as the company's facilities in Michigan, Massachusetts and Missouri. Meanwhile, Woodridge, Illinois-based Navitas Systems will purchase all of A123 Systems' government contracts for $2.25 million.


Automotive News reports A123 Systems, an electric vehicle battery manufacturer, received a disbursement check from the federal government on the same day the company filed for bankruptcy. On Oct. 16, A123 received $946,830 as the latest portion of a clean energy grant from the US Department of Energy. That was the same day A123 Systems filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection following a failed attempt to secure funding from Chinese parts supplier Wanxiang Group. Of the original grant, $115.8


Reuters is reporting on a new study that suggests the cost of lithium-ion batteries used in electric vehicles could plummet dramatically by 2025. Consulting firm McKinsey & Co. conducted the study, which indicated increasing oil prices and tougher fuel economy standards could force automakers to build more electric cars, thereby increasing the scale of lithium-ion battery manufacturing by significant margins. In addition, the research predicts consumer electronics companies like Apple may le


Here's a new worry for electric car owners: bricking your new, expensive ride.


Here's a new worry for electric car owners: bricking your new, expensive ride.


2011 Chevrolet Volt – Click above for high-res image gallery


Planar Energy, a spin-off of the National Renewable Energy Laboratories, has quietly been developing solid-state battery technology and remains convinced that the future of electric vehicle batteries is solid-state technology. The Orlando-based company believes that its solid-state design could potentially offer more power output and higher energy storage density than a typical lithium ion battery. As Planar Energy notes, typical lithium ion batteries lack stability and longevity due to undesira


As several countries vie for the top spot in the automotive rechargeable battery market, a few front-runners have emerged. Notably, China's push to lead the world in advanced battery technology has propelled the nation towards the front. The efforts here in the States have kept the U.S. in the running for top honors and you certainly can't overlook South Korea and Japan. As each country competes to rule the roost, more and more government money has been dished out to fund the advanced battery ef


Nissan Leaf battery pack - Click above for high-res image gallery


It seems like this story replays itself time and again. Some company is awarded a bunch of money from the federal government for advanced battery technology and claims that its breakthroughs will lead to yada yada yada. We've heard it many times, too, but it would be unfair not to give props when due, right?


After supplying batteries for the record-breaking Mira EV (pictured), Sanyo had little choice but to follow it up with something big. So that's just what they did. This time around, the project is more about future plans than 300-plus mile journeys, but the goal is still quite monumental. Sanyo will invest $2.1 billion to ramp up li-ion production for hybrid and electric vehicles in anticipation of reaching mass production levels by 2012.


Volkswagen e-up! concept – Click above for high-res image gallery


Bill Wallace showing off the Volt cell and battery pack – Click above for high-res image gallery

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