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European automakers want proposed CO2 emissions regulations for 2025 to be pushed back a further five years.

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About $27,000 Buys Eternal Fast-Charging Rights In Europe

Amsterdam-based Fastned offers lifetime free fast-charging rights to big shareholders.

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Just 6 Percent of Euro Fuel Supply Can Come From Biofuel by 2020

The European Parliament's Environment Committee votes to put a cap on first-generation biofuel use by 2020.

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Pat Cox Explains Europe's Current Hydrogen Infrastructure Situation

Pat Cox does not work for Toyota and we don't think he has any secret inside information. Still, he's the former President of the European Parliament and the current high level coordinator for TransEuropean Network, so when he says Toyota is likely going to lose between 50,000 and 100,000 euros ($66,000 and $133,000) on each of the hydrogen-powered FCV sedans it will sell next year, it's worth noting.

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New Keyword Is 'Appropriate'

If only all of us were told that we could meet our goals and obligations by merely being "appropriate." That's the operative word being used to describe the European Union's goals for setting up publicly accessible electric-vehicle charging station and hydrogen refueling station infrastructure by the end of the decade. Turns out, the goals were unrealistic.

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Stands For World Light Vehicle Test Procedure, FYI

A hard job may be getting a little harder for European automakers looking to meet stricter emissions mandates. Automakers charged with cutting fleetwide emissions by about 27 percent by 2021 may have to shave off even more emissions by then if the European Union has its way. That's because the EU is looking at instituting a new testing program to measure emissions in a way that some analysts say is more accurate than the long-held New European Drive Cycle (NEDC) testing system, Automotive News E

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What, you expected European automakers to test their vehicle emissions levels on gravel roads in a wind storm? Charged with cutting CO2 emissions by more than 30 percent within the next seven years, automakers reduced fleetwide emissions by four percent last year. Of course, such automakers may be gaming the system by testing cars on "unrealistically" smooth road surfaces and with tires that can provide extra traction, Reuters says. No word on whether such cars wind-drafted behind semi trucks.

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Police in the European Union are allegedly hard at work developing a remote-stopping system that would allow authorities to disable a vehicle at a moment's notice, according to a report from AutoExpress. It's being developed by the European Network of Law Enforcement Technology Services.

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If Germany sneezes, does the European Union catch a cold? Kind of, at least when we're talking about the EU's recent step to making its greenhouse-gas emissions standards set for the end of the decade a little less stringent after months of German automakers crying uncle, Reuters says.

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The Germans have an idea: when calculating fleetwide emissions rules at the end of the decade, don't count the 20 percent of our vehicles that are truly road-mauling gas guzzlers. That's more or less what the German government is asking for in its attempt to get the European Union to be a little more lenient about its strict emissions mandate for 2020, Bloomberg News reports.

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We're not sure how to translate "biting the hand that feeds you" to French, but we're pretty sure the phrase is appropriate here. See, Renault recently won funding of about $28 million from the European Commission to develop diesel-hybrid powertrains for commercial vans. The thing is, the French company may now join lobbying efforts with German automakers as they ask EC officials to loosen emissions restrictions set for the end of the decade, according to Reuters.

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Renault will receive 20.5 million euros (US$27.9 million) from the European Commission to develop diesel-hybrid powertrains for commercial vans, as the EC broadens its search for ways to cut emissions throughout the continent.

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If George Orwell were alive today and had read this story from The Daily Telegraph, he'd be standing in the middle of the Rue de la Loi, shouting "I told you so!" at the top of his lungs. In a bid to decrease the 30,000 deaths on European roads each year, the European Commission is seeking to require speed-limiting devices on all vehicles.

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France's highest administrative court said yesterday that authorities must resume registering Daimler vehicles, which were formally banned in late July, Automotive News reports, even though they are still equipped with R134a air-conditioning refrigerant.

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Was it right for Chevrolet to detune the 1975 Corvette's base engine to 165 horsepower? Was Aston Martin wrong to make the Toyota iQ-based Cygnet? Is BMW crazy to be testing the new 1 Series with three-cylinder engines and front-wheel drive? It seems now, just as in the 1970s and 1980s, that emissions regulations and social considerations are driving some automakers to adopt unbefitting practices to maintain acceptance in the eyes of governments and consumers. Jaguar has jumped on the bandwagon,

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PSA Peugeot-Citroën has been struggling to offer low finance rates to customers since its banking arm, Banque PSA Finance, had its credit score downgraded, which in turn has made it hard for the French carmaker to compete with brands that offer lower finance rates, such as Volkswagen. The French government recognized the catch-22 and, after negotiations with PSA and European Union approval, has guaranteed the banking arm seven billion euro in bonds to secure its debt and lower borrowing cos

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If they're not going to get you on the front end, they'll get you on the back end. That's what the European Union is accusing the Russian government of doing with automotive trade restrictions, and the US appears to agree, Reuters reports. The US is joining the EU in a World Trade Organization (WTO) claim that Russia is violating trade agreements by imposing an auto-recycling fees on cars imported into the country.

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Just three months ago, as of April, the story was that the European car market registered its first gain in 19 months, consumer confidence was up "higher than average" and observers were hoping the month could be the first footstep in the trek to "legitimate recovery," even though Europe's four-month sales were down seven percent. The stats for June are a return to dark portents, with Bloomberg now reporting that sales for the month haven't been this bad since 1993. As a result, investor confide

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The European Union (EU) is putting off its vote on stricter emissions standards for the continent, and Ford's none too happy about it.

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The German auto industry has been long lauded for its vehicles' achievements in speed. The German government is now saying the European Union's 2020 emissions mandate is coming up a little too quick for its liking.

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Automotive News Europe reports vehicle registrations in the European Union fell to 1.08 million in May. That's down from 1.15 million a year earlier and marks the lowest number for any May since 1993. General Motors, Peugeot-Citroen, Fiat, Renault, Ford, Volkswagen and Audi all saw sales fall off last month, though Seat managed to increase its sales by a relatively heady 13 percent. Currently, analysts are predicting that the European automotive market will continue to contract through 2013, tho

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