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The fight over upping the ethanol blend in America's gasoline continues with an entire series of salvos from the different camps. What's at stake is raising the amount of ethanol blended into the gasoline supply from a maximum of 10 percent today (making fuel known as E10) to either E12 or E15.

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Yet another cellulosic ethanol project launched recently, this time in Alpena, MI with Governor Jennifer Granholm on hand for the ribbon cutting. The facility will be run by American Process Incorporated (API) and will produce ethanol from waste materials produced by an adjacent hardwood plant that is run by Decorative Panels International.

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Now that we've covered the ethanol-related debate surrounding a move from E10 to E15 from almost every angle, it's time to move on to a discussion about E12. With the Environmental Protection Agency choosing to postpone its decision regarding E15 until further testing can be conducted, an interim move to E12 is now the suggested solution by farmers, ethanol blenders and proponents of renewable fuels.

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Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that its decision to raise the ethanol blend from ten percent (E10) to 15 percent (E15) had been postponed pending further testing. Prior to announcing the postponement, the EPA received reports from automakers suggesting that E15 could be detrimental to modern engines. Rather than act in haste, the EPA determined that in-depth testing of current vehicles could more accurately determine the effects of running E15. While the EPA's re

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The BP oil spill has reminded us that whether we love ethanol or hate it, it's still loads better than crude oil. Or at least that's what the corn ethanol lobbies would have us believe, according to Slate.

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets rules about the amount of ethanol found in gasoline that flows from the nation's pump. The current standard for blending ethanol with gasoline stands at ten percent (E10). With farmers holding pitchforks in the air in anger because they want to put more corn into cars, the EPA agreed to consider raising the ethanol blend to 15 percent (E15), a move that would avoid hitting the blend wall. As Green Car Advisor reports, the time to decide whether or

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be faced with a decision on the future of ethanol soon and no matter what choice is made, it won't be a popular one. Ethanol producers are pushing the EPA to raise the blend level in gasoline to 15 percent (E15), but automakers and oil companies are pushing back with hopes of keeping the current 10 percent level (E10).

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Turn back the clock to 2006, when Ford Motor Company announced it was taking flex-fuel vehicles seriously. That year, the company built 185,000 autos that could run on gasoline, ethanol or any combination of the two up to E85 (85 percent ethanol). Ford also pledged that the company's production of flex-fuel vehicles would double by 2010.

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Ethanol has been blended with gasoline for years now in a fuel typically called E10 (which is made with 10 percent ethanol). E15 could soon become the new norm if, as industry experts predict, the U.S. reaches the "blend wall" and changes come soon.

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Whatever else happened these last 10 years, not many groups would call the time "the era when biofuels such as ethanol came of age." But this is exactly the phrase that the Renewable Fuels Association uses to describe the Noughties.

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Today, we take another look at ethanol for our weekly Greenlings post. You've probably noticed that many vehicles are labeled with a Flex Fuel badge from the manufacturer, indicating that the car or truck is capable of running safely on E85 – a blend of 85-percent ethanol and 15-percent gasoline.

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The Virginia State Agriculture Department is investigating gas stations that might be selling people bad gas. In this case, "bad" means too much ethanol. While the maximum percentage of ethanol that can be blended with unleaded fuel in that state is 10 percent, some people claim that some stations are selling fuel with excess corn in it. The Department discovered a wide range of ethanol blends in different samples, with one reaching 50 percent. As regular readers know, it's a bad idea to pump th

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GM has long been a proponent of using high-level ethanol blend, E85, in motor vehicles. But, with all of the talk of putting E15 or E20 (gasoline with 15 or 20 percent ethanol blended in) into the national supply - see these earlier posts about the EPA, the Minnesota Ag Department, the Secretary of Agriculture, and the Underwriters Laboratories on the topic - GM's Biofuels Implementation Manager, Coleman Jones, has found "Seven Reasons Why Testing Mid-level Ethanol Blends Matters." The short ve

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In April, France will start selling ethanol blended at a 10 percent ratio into unleaded gasoline (aka, E10). This is two years in advance of when the European mandatory biofuel blends come into effect. France might need the extra time, since it is not looking like it will be an easy transition. For one thing, big oil companies started to complain. First, French giant Total stated that the distribution of E10 was too expensive, but they will still offer it at 4,000 pumps before the end of the yea

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