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100Fisker Karma gets EPA certified: 52 mpge, 32-mile electric range, 20 mpg on gas

Yikes. The EPA has finally released its official fuel economy rating for the Fisker Karma, and it's not high: just 52 MPGe, an all-electric range of 32 miles and 20 miles per gallon on gasoline when the battery runs dry. This is well below the numbers that Fisker reps were bandying about in past years: 67.2 mpge and an all-electric range of 50 miles.

99Fisker Karma gets EPA certified: 52 mpge, 32-mile electric range then 20 mpg

Yikes. The EPA has finally released its official fuel economy rating for the Fisker Karma, and it's not high: just 52 MPGe, an all-electric range of 32 miles and 20 miles per gallon on gasoline when the battery runs dry. This is well below the numbers that Fisker reps were bandying about in past years: 67.2 mpge and an all-electric range of 50 miles.

48Nissan Leaf snags 99 mpg rating on official EPA sticker

As far as we know, the first production Chevrolet Volt models are still awaiting their official EPA stickers. Nissan, though, has received the details on what the government agency has rated its all-electric Leaf at, and it looks good: a combined rating of 99 miles per gallon (equivalent) which breaks down into 106 city/92 highway. The official EPA range for the car is 73 miles, which Nissan admits is a variable (we know it can be beaten), and the annual electric cost is estimated at $561. The L

81Nissan Leaf snags 99 mpg rating on official EPA sticker

As far as we know, the first production Chevrolet Volt models are still awaiting their official EPA stickers. Nissan, though, has received the details on what the government agency has rated its all-electric Leaf at, and it looks good: a combined rating of 99 miles per gallon (equivalent) which breaks down into 106 city/92 highway. The official EPA range for the car is 73 miles, which Nissan admits is a variable (we know it can be beaten), and the annual electric cost is estimated at $561. The L

11EPA: Average fuel economy hit 22.4 mpg, a new record, in 2009

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, which first started keeping track of such things way back in 1975 around the time of the first fuel crisis in America, the average fuel economy of all vehicles sold in the U.S. hit a record high in 2009. For those favoring hard data, that equals 22.4 miles per gallon. Not surprisingly, average fuel economy has been on an upward path over the last several years (excluding a small dip in 2008).

21EPA issues first-ever fuel efficiency and emissions standard proposal for heavy-duty vehicles

As expected, the EPA has released its first-ever proposal for greenhouse gas and fuel efficiency standards for heavy-duty vehicles. The proposal, and that's all it is at this point, would create three new categories for heavy trucks: combination tractors, heavy-duty pickups and vans, and vocational vehicles. The rules will cover on-road vehicles with a gross vehicle weight at or above 8,500 pounds, unless these vehicles are already covered under CAFE. All of these proposals would start with the

15EPA issues first-ever fuel efficiency and emissions standard proposal for heavy-duty vehicles

As expected, the EPA has released its first-ever proposal greenhouse gas and fuel efficiency standards for heavy-duty vehicles. The proposal, and that's all it is at this point, would create three new categories for heavy trucks: combination tractors, heavy-duty pickups and vans, and vocational vehicles. The rules will cover on-road vehicles with a gross vehicle weight at or above 8,500 pounds, unless these vehicles are already covered under CAFE. All of these proposals would start with the 2014

53EPA finally issues proposed fuel economy labels for plug-in vehicles

Proposed window stickers for plug-in hybrid vehicles – click above for high-res image gallery

92011 Lincoln MKX gets best in class mileage, 19/26 mpg with V6, Ecoboost still to come

2011 Lincoln MKX – Click above for high-res image gallery

36Beyond 2016, automakers push for even stronger CAFE regulations, maybe a gas tax too

It's not all that often that you hear automakers cry out for stronger regulations and stricter guidelines. In fact, the cries typically go the other way, begging for less oversight and looser laws. So, when automakers band together suggesting changes to CAFE guidelines beyond 2016 that would take fuel economy figures to new heights, we should probably listen, right?

13Audi pursues widespread engine downsizing to increase fuel economy

2010 Audi S4 – Click above for high-res image gallery

13REPORT: EPA planning to address outlandish fuel economy claims of electric cars

The EPA is aware that range-extended electric vehicles can game the current fuel economy test to deliver mileage estimates way up in the stratosphere. It makes for impressive advertising, like General Motors' touting of the Chevrolet Volt's estimated 230 mpg, but the EPA wants to give a more realistic reflection of the fuel efficiency of these types of cars, and it's not alone.

38REPORT: EPA planning to address outlandish fuel economy claims of electric cars

The EPA is aware that range-extended electric vehicles can game the current fuel economy test to deliver mileage estimates way up in the stratosphere. It makes for impressive advertising, like General Motors' touting of the Chevrolet Volt's estimated 230 mpg, but the EPA wants to give a more realistic reflection of the fuel efficiency of these types of cars, and it's not alone.

21ETV Motors challenges EPA on emerging plug-in MPG rules

ETV Motors, the company behind the modified Prius with an extended-range microtubrine, believes that the EPA's emerging MPG methodology for plug-in vehicles – the one that allowed GM to proclaim a 230 mpg rating for the Chevy Volt and which Nissan used to say the all-electric Leaf gets 367 mpg – is clear as mud. The system makes it difficult for a consumer to relate to the resulting numbers "in any meaningful way to actual vehicle performance." ETV wrote an open letter that also says

38Bill Ford, AdAge chide GM over 230 MPG Chevrolet Volt MPG projection

The Chevrolet Volt's 230 mpg number continues to be questioned. The latest to criticize is Bill Ford, who takes issue not only with the General Motors-approved 230 figure, but also Nissan's claim that its Leaf EV will get 367 mpg. The real culprit here, Ford said, is the EPA's methodology, which he argues is meaningless. "This question devolves into madness," Ford reportedly told Green Car Advisor:

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