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var digg_url = 'http://digg.com/environment/Chevron_subsidiary_cancels_contract_for_hybrid_batteries'; Plans for Mercedes to release the ML 450 hybrid in 2009 may very well be canceled. The maker of the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries that was to provide the energy storage component for the SUV, Cobasys, seems to be refusing to begin production of the essential part. It appears the company's parent firms, Chevron (who just posted a $5.98 billion 2nd quarter profit) and Energy Conversion

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While the issue of the nine-thousand recalled batteries from Cobasys remains a bit murky, General Motors may be inclined to just purchase the troubled battery-maker altogether. While we're not entirely sure that another money-losing operation is exactly what GM needs right about now, we can be sure that GM needs those nickel metal hydride batteries for its current range of mild hybrids. Right now, Cobasys is co-owned by Chevron and Energy Conversion Devices, though the two companies have been bi

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Just a day after announcing that they would be supplying nickel metal hydride batteries for the upcoming Chevy Malibu hybrid, Cobasys is now up for sale. Cobasys is jointly owned by Energy Conversion Devices and Chevron Technology Ventures. Cobasys also has a partnership with A123 to develop lithium ion battery packs for the Saturn Vue plug-in hybrid program. The owners have hired investment bankers to examine the possibilities for sale, new investment or public offering. If Cobasys-A123 gets th

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To list all of Stanford Ovshinsky's achievements would take half the storage on our server, but few environmentalists really know of him. Fifty years ago he envisioned a hydrogen economy and is the inventor of the nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) battery that is utilized in hybrid vehicles. Many other inventions and innovations can be traced to his discoveries in amorphous materials used for energy generation or storage. His current efforts are based out a company called Energy Conversion Devices (EC

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One truth about the hydrogen economy (other than that it's constantly 10-20 years away) is that no one really knows what it's going to look like. All of the technology involved (hydrogen production, fuel cells, etc.) is constantly being revamped and further developed. An article earlier this week from the Oakland Press does a good job of coving a lot of the issues, but the fulcrum of the story is a modified Prius hybrid, which Sam wrote about a few weeks ago. The Prius was changed by Energy Conv

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