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Porsche may be getting rid of the V8 diesel option for the Cayenne SUV because upgrading to comply with European emissions standards is pricey.

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Shop denies any wrongdoing

A woman who dropped her car off at a local repair shop in Portland, Oregon was surprised to receive a ticket after one of the shop's employees was caught running a red light at 3am in her car.

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Anyone even vaguely familiar with the European auto market knows that diesel-fueled vehicles take up a huge portion of the roads there. A combination of high fuel efficiency, useful torque in tightly packed cities, low CO2 emissions and tax incentives all contribute to the popularity. However, ever the iconoclasts, the French government wants the oil burners off its roads in the coming years.

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Is the water vapor coming out of Toyota's first production fuel-cell vehicle drinkable? If you're driving through the Sierra Nevadas? Probably. Cruising through Beijing? Not so much.

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In UK, Exhaust Emissions Kill More Than Crashes Do

That dirty look parents (OK, some parents) give a cigarette smoker blowing smoke towards their kids? Maybe those should extend to drivers of cars using conventional internal-combustion engines. Which would make for a whole lot of stink-eye.

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European automakers are apparently a little off in their collective emissions ratings for their vehicles. Way off, actually. To the tune of $580 in refueling costs per driver. The vehicles likely emitted 38 percent more CO2 than what they were rated at, according to Bloomberg News, which cites a report by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), and that leads to the extra refueling costs.

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Lab Results Not Accurate, Everyone Admits

Testing vehicle emissions in the laboratory is a way to guarantee identical procedures, but it doesn't exactly mimic the results from an on-the-road drive. Ford, for example, famously had a problem with dynamometer testing in the Total Road Load Horsepower (TRLHP) calculations for the C-Max Hybrid. Over in Europe, the authorities are considering new rules that will not affect the emissions levels that need to be reached (those are already in process) but how the vehicles will be tested. Reuters

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In 2007, the European Union mandated fleet average CO2 emissions of 158.7 g/km. For 2015, that figure will drop to 130 g/km, and the target for 2020 is an ambitions 95 g/km. Thanks to some German politicking, that target will be phased in from 2020 to 2024, but it will still apply to 80 percent of passenger cars in that first year. In US miles per gallon, that's the equivalent of going from about 35 mpg to 42 mpg to 57 mpg. The current Volkswagen Golf is rated from 85 g/km of CO2 to 190 g/km dep

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Imagine if a little bit of water could make your internal combustion engine run cleaner and more efficiently, and help it produce more oxygen than a tree. That's what the LeefH2 device is designed to help your motor do. HNO Green Fuels, the maker of the LeefH2, wants to turn your engine – and every other combustion engine – into an oxygen farm while reducing particulate matter and getting more power out of your fuel.

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Jason Mendelson was driving his Toyota Prius in the right lane of Interstate 64 near Richmond, Virginia, when a white pickup truck with two protruding smokestacks cut into the lane ahead.

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When it comes to diesel trucks, the good old days weren't so good. Go back a quarter-century, for instance. Back then, a single diesel-powered truck was throwing off about 60 times the emissions a typical "clean diesel" truck does today. Cough.

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Stands For World Light Vehicle Test Procedure, FYI

A hard job may be getting a little harder for European automakers looking to meet stricter emissions mandates. Automakers charged with cutting fleetwide emissions by about 27 percent by 2021 may have to shave off even more emissions by then if the European Union has its way. That's because the EU is looking at instituting a new testing program to measure emissions in a way that some analysts say is more accurate than the long-held New European Drive Cycle (NEDC) testing system, Automotive News E

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In the late 1970s, performance cars suffered a huge blow when the necessity for better economy and lower emissions crippled their power. It took nearly a decade for the horsepower to return. Today, we're in the middle of another push for greater vehicle efficiency, but don't expect another era of malaise this time. Instead, lightweight materials, turbos and hybrids mean that everyone can be happy. However, the pressure to clean up isn't just for the mass market, supercars must improve too, but F

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Electric Vehicle's ‘Global Warming Potential’ 40 Percent Lower

The heart of the matter is that the battery-electric Kia Soul is better for the environment. And not just because it doesn't create any emissions while on the road. From beginning to end, the Soul EV has a far lower environmental impact than its more conventional counterparts.

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Chrysler Group's TorqueFlite eight-speed transmission could be earning some serious green bragging rights if the company's projections are correct. The recently widely proliferated automatic gearbox, which is now in more than a million vehicles around the world, is poised to save drivers an estimated 700+ million gallons of fuel over the vehicles' lifetimes (an expected cost savings of $2.5 billion). In addition, Chrysler expects a reduction in CO2 emissions by more than six million metric tons.

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Car clubs in Scotland are getting some electric love from their government. The UK is putting £1,000,000 ($1.7 million US) of new funding toward electric vehicles, specifically encouraging the clean growth of car clubs Scotland. Those funds are expected to provide as many as 30 additional EVs for the clubs.

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People rightfully dislike wireless signals being transmitted from the person behind the wheel when they text while drive, but there are times when a car's wireless signals can be good news. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have found a way to use wireless signals under the hood to help cut pollution from heavy-duty vehicles such as diesel-powered trucks. That's something we can get behind.

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Some of the world's most notoriously smoggy cities are hoping for relief in a new plan taking aim at what's coming out of their tailpipes. In response to serious air pollution problems and an attempt to meet emissions standards, China plans to decommission more than 5 million aging vehicles by the end of 2014. 330,000 of the cars being retired will come from Beijing, which sees some 31 percent of its PM2.5 particulate matter coming from vehicle emissions. In all, 20 percent of the vehicles being

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Airborne particulate matter can really do a number on us humans, particularly with regard to our cardiovascular systems. It seems reasonable for air pollution, then, to be a major concern when calculating the environmental and health costs of the way we do business. Diesel-powered transport has come under particularly scrutiny and particulate matter from diesel exhaust has been widely blamed for diseases such as lung cancer in humans. Perhaps, though, commercial diesel has gotten too tough of a

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Another Swedish family is taking the One Tonne Life eco-challenge from Volvo and is enjoying the results. This time, it's the Jogensjö family, which is taking on the challenge three years after the Lindell family did the same. Only the Jogensjös get to drive around in a Volvo V60 Plug-in Hybrid, whereas the Lindells had to "make due" with a Volvo C30 battery-electric.

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Tell us if you're surprised that Toyota (through its Lexus brand) is putting out some questionable information about electric vehicles. While it's one thing for company executives to be anti-EV, it's quite another to put out obviously false information when you speak ill of plug-in vehicles, especially when you also sell them. The automaker offers the RAV4 EV and Prius Plug-In, albeit in limited numbers,

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