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34Germany still fighting for weaker CO2 emission laws

The Germans have an idea: when calculating fleetwide emissions rules at the end of the decade, don't count the 20 percent of our vehicles that are truly road-mauling gas guzzlers. That's more or less what the German government is asking for in its attempt to get the European Union to be a little more lenient about its strict emissions mandate for 2020, Bloomberg News reports.

6Renault may join German effort to loosen European emissions limits

We're not sure how to translate "biting the hand that feeds you" to French, but we're pretty sure the phrase is appropriate here. See, Renault recently won funding of about $28 million from the European Commission to develop diesel-hybrid powertrains for commercial vans. The thing is, the French company may now join lobbying efforts with German automakers as they ask EC officials to loosen emissions restrictions set for the end of the decade, according to Reuters.

27Why a global emissions standard would be a good thing

Would a global vehicle emission standard make sense? After all, as Automotive News writer Richard Truett points out, "Clean air is clean air no matter what continent it blows over." But, while attending a recent automotive industry conference in Traverse City, MI, Truett heard Chris Gundler, the director of the EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality, respond to a question about the US and European Union adopting uniform emissions standards, and Gunder responded that he doesn't think that

16Nigeria bans two-stroke engines, adopts Euro II emissions standards from 1996

It may not be on most people's news radar, but the West African nation of Nigeria has a problem with the effects of roadside pollution. As Africa's most populous nation, Nigeria has its share of smog-filled cities, congested roads and aging vehicles. In an effort to clear the air, Nigeria will, effective December 1, 2012, require all vehicles sold within the country to meet Euro II emissions standards, according to Nigeria's National Automotive Council (NAC).

12EPA proposes strict ground-level emissions regulations for jumbo-sized commercial aircraft

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to adopt more stringent ground-level emissions standards for engines used primarily in commercial aircraft, including Boeing's 737, 747, and 767. If approved, the proposed regulations would reduce ground-level nitrogen oxide emissions by an estimated 100,000 tons nationwide by 2030.

3Study: Vehicle emissions down 14% since 2007

Consumers are now buying cleaner, more fuel-efficient vehicles, according to something called the Eco-Drive Index that was compiled by researchers at the University of Michigan. In fact, the researchers found that emissions from recently purchased vehicles are 14 percent lower than back in 2007.

9Lung Association lobbies for stricter emissions standards in California

As the California Air Resources Board prepares to decide on emissions regulations that could increase fuel economy requirements of 2017 to 2025 model year vehicles, the state's American Lung Association is pushing regulators to adopt stricter standards. In a recent report, the American Lung Association in California claims that the state could save $7.2 billion in health-related costs if more stringent emissions standards were to be adopted. The Lung Association says that, over the course

24Federal court denies NADA/CoC challenge to California's EPA waiver status

Today, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's and the National Automobile Dealers Association's (NADA) challenge to California's rules that limit vehicle emissions was dismissed by a federal appeals court in Washington, D.C. The reason? The court stated (pdf) that it had no jurisdiction to rule over the case.

13AN: CO2 emission tests, real-world numbers don't match

Do new vehicles in Europe actually emit less CO2 than previous models or have automakers simply discovered techniques to skew the results of emissions tests?

18Administration pushes forward despite House panel's attempt to block EPA's emissions regulations

The Clean Air Act of 2007 granted the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to regulate vehicle emissions. Furthermore, the act gave individual states permission to set their own emissions policies (the dreaded "patchwork"), a move that would've forced automakers to develop cars that meet different standards depending on where the vehicle would eventually be sold. After a lot of discussion and lobbying, the federal government adopted a nationwide mandate of 34.1 miles per gallon by

4Beijing to impose stricter Level 5 emissions standards in 2012

Beijing has a pollution problem, but that's not surprising since most major cities across the globe battle with dense smog on a regular basis. However, the Chinese capital will take a dramatic step towards reducing pollutants by imposing Level V emissions standards in 2012. While speaking at a press conference on the sidelines of the annual session of the National People's Congress, Zhang Lijun, the country's vice-minister of environmental protection, announced that:

22Study: Slashing air pollution could add two years to your life

Rising levels of roadside air pollution plague major cities across the globe. Over in Europe, fine particulate pollution in the cities of Bucharest, Budapest, Barcelona, Paris, Rome and London – to name a few – has been measured at levels exceeding the United Nations World Health Organization's recommended 10 micrograms per cubic meter. In fact, out of 25 European cities studied, only Stockholm was consistently be below the UN's 10 microgram threshold.

28U.S. reportedly asks South Korea to adopt American emissions, safety standards

The powers-that-be in the States are working on getting the go-ahead for a free trade agreement, like NAFTA, but this time with South Korea. The agreement itself was signed and sealed in 2007, but it hasn't actually gone into effect yet because Congress won't approve it, and that's because of two hangups, one being emissions regulations that the U.S. maintains is a non-tariff barrier to selling cars in in South Korea.

530 European companies call on EU to cut CO2 emissions 30% by 2020

Thirty European companies banded together and called on the European Union (EU) to slash emissions 30 percent by 2020. Sound like a lot? Hold on a sec, since there's some background information needed to understand this one. The current target set by the EU calls for an emission's reduction of 20 percent from 1990 levels by 2020. The 30 companies are now calling for extending the emission's target by another 10 percent, so it's not as dramatic as it might sound.

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