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46Jaguar envisions future without V8 engines

With tighter emissions and fuel economy regulations looming, Jaguar may have to do more than make a small, fuel-efficient hatchback to lower its model range's consumption figures – it also might give up its venerable V8 power, Drive reports. But not anytime soon, says Steven de Ploey, Jaguar's product and marketing director, who recognizes that the V8 can be replaced only by something that offers the same, or better, performance. But he has a word of caution: "We are not wedded to V8s."

AddFrost & Sulllivan predicts over a million CNG/LPG vehicle sales by 2018

Vehicles powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) aren't quite as exciting as cars that pack a big battery pack, but there's a good chance the gas-burners will play an increasing role in our transportation choice moving forward. Like 1,150,000 big.

AddNigeria bans two-stroke engines, adopts Euro II emissions standards from 1996

It may not be on most people's news radar, but the West African nation of Nigeria has a problem with the effects of roadside pollution. As Africa's most populous nation, Nigeria has its share of smog-filled cities, congested roads and aging vehicles. In an effort to clear the air, Nigeria will, effective December 1, 2012, require all vehicles sold within the country to meet Euro II emissions standards, according to Nigeria's National Automotive Council (NAC).

AddLung Association lobbies for stricter emissions standards in California

As the California Air Resources Board prepares to decide on emissions regulations that could increase fuel economy requirements of 2017 to 2025 model year vehicles, the state's American Lung Association is pushing regulators to adopt stricter standards. In a recent report, the American Lung Association in California claims that the state could save $7.2 billion in health-related costs if more stringent emissions standards were to be adopted. The Lung Association says that, over the course

59California regulators shooting for 40 mpg by 2020

The recently passed federal regulations adjust the average vehicle fuel economy standards to 35 mpg by 2020. Long before the Federal Government passed the new standards, the State of California had their mind set on enforcing their own rules. In order to individualize the regulations, California and the 15 other states following on its heels, needed a waiver from the EPA. The Golden State had never been previously denied a request, but the EPA lagged in issuing an approval. After all that waitin

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