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Thirty European companies banded together and called on the European Union (EU) to slash emissions 30 percent by 2020. Sound like a lot? Hold on a sec, since there's some background information needed to understand this one. The current target set by the EU calls for an emission's reduction of 20 percent from 1990 levels by 2020. The 30 companies are now calling for extending the emission's target by another 10 percent, so it's not as dramatic as it might sound.

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According to a 15-month long study conducted in part by the European Commission, Europe's transportation sector could feasibly cut its greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels by a resounding 89 percent by 2050. While the study concludes that the EU could cut emissions by nearly 90 percent, it's almost impossible that this will actually happen. It's not that the study is inaccurate, it's just that many of the targets cited are far from obtainable without drastic changes to transportation as we

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If you've got a favorite European automaker, you can now find out how dirty their cars are. R.L. Polk conducted a study on automakers average CO2 emissions for 2005 vehicles relative to other brands and to their own 1997 cars. The study found that Fiat was emitting the least (139 grams of CO2 per kilometer, on average) and Volvo was the worst (195 grams). The BBC has ranked the manufacturers by percent of a voluntary 2008 target achieved rather than by the more useful average CO2 emitted per kil

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