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A New Jersey woman made a fake 911 call last week to distract police so she could drive home drunk from a bar.


BMW is equipping its i3 electric hatchback for use by police, fire, and ambulance services around the world. There's even one transporting cash around Warsaw in place of an armored truck.


A man in Florida had the bright idea last week to make a phony call to 911 in an attempt to get out of a speeding ticket.


A small plane made an emergency landing in the middle of rush hour traffic on the streets of Irvine, CA last week, much to the surprise of the drivers stuck in traffic.


Volkswagen has prepared an array of police and emergency vehicles to showcase at the RETTmobil show in Germany, including first-responder versions of the Golf, Passat, Tiguan, Touareg, Amarok, Transporter and Crafter.


Forget FEMA. Portland, Oregon's relief – if and when the Big One hits – might just come in the form of an army of bike riders. Most likely fueled by caffeine rations.


One woman found out the hard way that her car didn't come with a doughnut

A spare tire use to be standard equipment in a new car, an extra layer of safety distressed drivers could count on to get them out of a jam. But those days are over.


It was only a matter of time before law enforcement agencies would realize the potential of driver-assist technology for use in their Ford Police Interceptors, and, now that they have, those back-up cameras and radar systems won't be used just for parking, but for security, as well.


Mercedes-Benz is working on a system that may help emergency workers quickly and safely rescue trapped occupants in wrecked vehicles. The system pairs rescue sheets that show firefighters, police and paramedics information on exactly how and where to use rescue sheers to extract trapped passengers, the location of major hydraulic lines, air bags and electrical cables as well as other important vehicle data with QR codes. Using two stickers with the codes prominently displayed, rescue workers can


Edmunds has taken a closer look at which vehicles are most heavily favored by the federal government by evaluating percentage of model sales in 2011. Not surprisingly the Chevrolet Caprice topped off the list with a whopping 79.2 percent of sales going to government agencies, while the out-to-pasture Ford Crown Victoria took second with 57.2 percent of total sales. But that's pretty much where the predictability comes to a close. The Chevrolet Express van takes a distant third with 10.7 percent.


What you see here is an ambulance. It's based on the Sharan, a van Volkswagen offers in certain overseas markets. We shall therefore call it the Sharanbulance.


Click above to watch the video after the jump


If you are involved in or are a witness to an accident, what's the first thing you should do? Call #911, right? While we're certainly not advising against using the emergency service, making that call may wind up being rather costly to either yourself or the victim. Proof of such can be seen in the case of Cary Feldman, who was traveling through Chicago Heights, IL on his motor scooter when he was stuck from behind.


Click above for a high-res gallery of the Hoover P.D. Porsche


The coachbuilder has long since evolved from being the small design house it once was into a major manufacturing facility, with capacity to produce 70,000 cars each year. But in order to break even, it needs to build at least 30,000 per year. It was building a special-edition MINI, but that ended over a year ago, and production of the Astra convertible ended two years ago. Over the last three years, according to reports, Bertone has lost €37.3 million ($55.4 million).


We've never had the pleasure of being stranded in our cars, relying on our dormant Order of the Arrow skills. Turns out, though, you only need $25 to ensure your co-pilot doesn't turn into a giant pot roast before your eyes. The resourceful folks over at Backwoods Home have given considerable thought to the possibility of riding out a stranding and coming out of it well-fed, clear eyed, and rested.


The City of San Francisco announced Thursday that the city's fire department will begin a six-month pilot program to use B20 in fire trucks and other emergency vehicles. The pilot program will be limited to the SE part of SF, and biodiesel use will likely expand to the fleet citywide after completion. The San Francisco Fire Department did a six-month study on using B20 in two fire trucks, six engines and one ambulance before announcing the pilot program. There are currently 800 alternative fuel

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