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Over at Motley Fool, Travis Hoium argues that there's a right way and a wrong way to jump on the electric vehicle investment bandwagon.

Nissan executive vice-president Andy Palmer is one chatty man. Late last week, Palmer headed a Q&A session with Nissan Global Media Center. While much of the discussion focused on electric vehicles, it's Palmer's answer to question number nine that piqued our curiosity:

ECOtality charger map for Phoenix area – Click above for high-res image

General Electric, which recently unveiled its electric vehicle (EV) charger called the WattStation, has teamed up with battery swap specialist Better Place to accelerate the adoption of a global EV infrastructure. The duo will attack the industry on all fronts. Under the partnership, GE and Better Place will develop a battery financing program that kicks off with a pilot project providing funds for 10,000 batteries in Israel and Denmark. This project is expected to boost consumer interest in EVs

A group of equity investors led by HSBC have expressed a big vote of confidence in the electric vehicle infrastructure concept being proposed by Better Place with a new $350 million funding round. The investment, which values the company at $1.25 billion, is expected to close by the end of March and includes $125 million from HSBC for a ten percent stake in Better Place. Better Place still plans to deploy nationwide networks of charging points and battery exchange stations in Israel and Denmark

Although many share the vision of ubiquitous infrastructure to support future fleets of electric vehicles, the concept of battery swapping, frequently championed by Better Place, doesn't seem to have the same appeal as the fast-charge station. In fact, in the past week, battery swapping has come under a bit of fire from different quarters. On one side of the globe, we have Mercedes' director of group research and car development, Thomas Weber, telling The Marker that not only is the swapping pla

For the foreseeable future, the only truly affordable electric cars are likely to be those that contain relatively small batteries and have correspondingly short ranges. Making those kinds of cars appealing to a mass audience will require that people be able to easily charge those cars anywhere and everywhere in order to make up for the short range. Helping to make that infrastructure a reality is the job of Rayna Handelman. Handelman is Nissan's Global Electric Vehicle Coordinator, a role in wh

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